Ancestors of Tim Farr and Descendants of Stephen Farr Sr. of Concord, Massachusetts and Lidlington, Bedfordshire, England


Russell Horace FARR [Parents] [scrapbook] 1-8559 was born 2 on 18 Dec 1852 in Ludlow, Windsor, Vermont, United States. He died 3 on 10 Nov 1919 in Bellows Falls, Windham, Vermont, United States. Russell married (MRIN:3781) Susan MCNULTY "Susie"-8581 on 4 Oct 1874 in Proctorsville, Windsor, Vermont, United States.

Russell H. Farr of Proctorsville (Windsor Co.) Vt. and His wife Susie McNulty

Soon after his birth, Mr. Farrs parents moved to Proctorsville, the village founded by Capt. Proctor in the town of Cavendish. Russell lived his entire life in Proctorsvflle. He took up farming on his fathers farm on Twenty-Mile Stream which occupation he continued until he found work in the Proctorsville mill. This marriage was the first one in the Farr family where ad if ferent  'ethncty entered the decendancy with Susie McNulty, whose mother was born in Ireland, and whose father was of Irish descend and born in St. Johns, Canada. Susie was born in an Irish tenament village in Mt. Holly, where the Irish were all residing as they worked on building the railroad through Vermont. NEWS OF THE RUSSELL FARR FAMILY Proctorsville, 2 Nov., 1877: "On Saturday evening last, Robert Stewart hitched his horse to the post in front of Clark H. Chapmans law office and went into the office; in a few minutes, Russell Farr came up street with a straw bed on a wheelbarrow and the horse, upon seeing it, concluded to leave that place, accordingly after twisting the wagon and a part of the harness several times around the post, he left it and ran up the street, as far as the hotel where he stopped to see if the, scare' was following him. The wagon and harness were very badly bent and Stewart borrowed to return home with."

17 Oct., 1884: "Kimball C. Grimes and wife Harriet, of Illinois, were the guests of Russell Farr last Sabbath. They start for their Western home this week." 28 Aug., 1885: "The lawn party at the house of Russell Farr on the 5th under the auspices of the L. B. A., was an enjoyable affair, being a financial success." 6 April, 1889: "Mrs. Russell Farr was thrown from a carriage on Saturday night. The horse starling as she stepped into the carriage, when she picked up the reins which were crossed, turned the horse around instead of stopping him. The wheels, coming in contact with the platform near Henry P. Gammons blacksmith shop, turned the carriage over. Luther A. French, in trying to get the reins, partly caught her as she fell; both were lamed and she was bruised, but no serious injuries resulted." 12 July, 1889: "The brick building owned by the factory company, used for many years as a boarding house, has been undergoing thorough repairs inside and out, made into two tenements, and is now occupied by Russell Farr, and Luther A. French." 27 Sept., 1889: "John Sheehan and Russell Farr have secured employment in Rutland, the former in T. J. Mullens blacksmith shop, and the other in the employ of the electric light company." In 1890, Russ purchased the home a little ways up Twenty-Mile Stream road from Rhoda L. Rice, and worked to make it one of the prettiest residences in the village.

10 July, 1891: "Russell Farr has purchased of William Smith Jr., the home on Twenty-Mile Stream, belonging to the estate of his father. Mr. Farr takes immediate possession, but will not move until fall." 11 Sept., 1891: Russell Farr has moved to the home he recently purchased. The tenement he vacates is to be occupied by Herbert Batty." 18 March, 1892: "Notwithstanding the inclemency of the weather last Friday evening, about twenty-five attended the sociable at Russell Farrs, given by the Christian Endeavor Society." 9 Sept., 1892: "The members of the Y. P. S. C. E. held a sociable Tuesday evening at the home of Russell Farr, which was largely attended, seventy persons partaking of the refreshments. A party of twenty-two young people from Ludlow were present." 31 Aug., 1894: "Mrs. Russell Farr and Mrs. W. P. Bowman are visiting friends in Rutland for a few days." 14 Dec., 1894: "There will be a dime sociable at Mrs. Russell Farrs next Wednesday evening, Dec. 19th, under the auspices of the Christian Endeavor Society. Cake and coffee will be served. A cordial invitation is extended to all."

In July of 1900, Russ built a new front piazza to his home on Twenty-Mile Stream road. He also was employed for 55 years in the Murdock Woolen Mills. Because ofit's on and off again operation in the early 1900s, many of the mill workers had to, at limes, find work elsewhere.

5 April, 1901: "Russell Farr and Andrew Dunlap went to Saxtons River Monday and are working in the woolen mill there." The mill in Proctorsvflle had shut down for a week. Proctorsville, 26 April, 1901: "The mill in this village started last Monday and the following Proctorsville people who have been working in other mills for the past weeks have returned to their former positions here: John Farrell from Saugus, Mass.; Fred Shedd from Fitchburg, Mass; Mrs. Wallace from Tilton, NH; Mr. & Mrs. Frank Cherrer from Bridgewater, and Russell Farr, Clarence Bailey and Andrew Dunlap from Saxtons River." 5 Sept., 1902: "Russell Farr, who has been sick at his daughters Mrs. Paradys at Bellows Falls for some time past, is reported very low. Mrs. Farr is with him and his father was in Bellows Falls on Wednesday."

Russ was a member of St. James Methodist Church. He was treasurer of the Epworth League, May, 1901 and Master of Lafayette Lodge F and AM and past Grant of Mt. Sinai Lodge. His wife,"Susie", was well-loved in the community. She was elected President of the Proctorsvflle Lathes Aide Society of the Methodist Church, 23 June, 1899. The annual business meeting of the Lades Ad society was held 8 Aug., 1900 at the Farr home. Mrs. Fred Don Pollard was elected President, and Susie, Vice President. Clara Putnam was chosen Secretary with Mrs. Jenny E. Archer as treasurer. Susie was Chaplain and Warden of Mt. Sinai Lodge of Rebekahs and Odd Fellow from 26 Jan., 1906 until her death.

Proctorsville, 20 May, 1898: "Russell Farr has had his house painted." 8 Sept., 1899, "Mr. & Mrs. Russell Farr and Floyd have gone on a carriage drive to New London, NH to visit Mr. & Mrs. L. A. French." 23 May, 1902: "Mr. and Mrs. Russell Farr went to Bellows Falls Saturday to visit their daughter, Mrs. Charles Parady. Mr. Farr returned home Monday and Mrs. Farr on Tuesday." 21 Nov., 1902: "Russell Farr returned to his work in the mill Monday after a severe and extended illness." - 2 Jan., 1903: "Mr. and Mrs. Charles Parady of Bellows Falls and Leon Farr of Brattleboro spent Christmas at Russell Farrs." - 17 April, 1903: Mrs. R. Farr and son Floyd went to Bellows Falls Friday to spend a few days with her daughter, Mrs. Mabel Parady." 29 May, 1903: "Rev. W. N. Roberts and fam fly of Pittsfield, and Mr. & Mrs. Charles Parady of Bellows Falls, are visiting at R. H. Farrs." 17 July, 1903,  Proctorsville: "Mr. & Mrs. Russell Farr went to Brownsville Saturday to visit W. P. Bowman and wife and returned on Sunday." 7 Aug., 1903: "R. H. Farr went to Bellows Falls Saturday morning to visit his daughter, Mrs. Charles Parady, returning Sunday night on the sleeper." 4 Sept., 1903: "W. P. Bowman and wife, Mr. Upham and wife of Brownsville and Elwin Bailey wife and child of Ludlow, were at Russell Farrs on Sunday." 18 Sept., 1903: "Russell Farr has been confined to the house by sickness for a few days." 6 Nov., 1903: "Mrs. W. P. Bowman and Mrs. Brown of West Windsor were guests of R. H. Farr and wife Thursday of last week." 27 Nov., 1903: "R.H. Farr and wife went to Springfield on Tuesday afternoon to attend the funeral of Elmer Gould."

Proctorsville, 1 Jan., 1904: "Mr. & Mrs. R. H. Farr and son Floyd went to Bellows Falls Friday morning to spend Christmas with their daughter Mabel, Mr. Farr returning Saturday night, Mrs. Farr and son an Monday noon." - 26 Feb., 1904: "Mrs. R. H. Farr has so for recovered from her recent illness as to be able to be out again. Mrs. Charles Parody of Bellows Falls is spending the week with her parents." 1 April, 1904: "Mrs. R. H. Farr went to Bellows Falls Sunday morning, called there by the sickness of her daughters, Mrs. Parady." 8 April, 1904: "Mrs. R. H. Farr returned Monday noon from a week's say with her daughter Mabel at Bellows Falls." 9 Sept., 1904, "Mrs. Russell Farr went to Bellows Falls Saturday to consult Dr. Gorham for ear trouble." 11 Nov., 1904: "Leon Farr of Brattleboro gave his parents a call Tuesday an his way to Burlington." 2 Dec., 1904: "Charles Parody came Wednesday evening from Bellows Falls to spend the day with his wife Mabel at R. H. Fan's. Fred Williams and wife from Rutland were guests also, at the same place." 9 Dec., 1904: "Saturday evening the Rebekahs and Odd Fellows met at their hail to celebrate a tripe event: The 30th wedding anniversary of Mr. & Mrs. R. H. Farr, the 20th Wedding anniversary of Mr. & Mrs. H. C. Wyman, and the 32nd birthday of Mrs. Nara Carpenter. It was a genuine surprise to each individual, each knew about the others anniversary, but not of their awn. H. H. Battey on behalf of bath lodges, presented each with a half dozen silver knives and forks together with the good wishes of bath lodges." - 14 July, 1905,  Proctorsville: "Mrs. R. H. Far and son Floyd went Saturday to Bellows Falls to spend the week with her daughter, Mrs. Parody." 18 Aug., 1905: "R. H. Farr and wife, J. E. Gould and wife, Ed Brawn and wife, G. D. Ordway and wife, and S. Piper and wife, are in camp at Lake Rescue for the week." 22 Sept., 1905: "R. H. Farr wishes to say to the party who took from his garden the past week, the largest and nicest squash, that they are perfectly welcome to the squash if they will only let him have a few of the seeds, and if they feel a little delicate about coming with them in person, to send them through the mail."

Proctorsville, 18 May, 1906: "R. H. Farr, wife and son, went to Bellows Falls on Friday to visit their daughter Mrs. Parody and returned on Monday." 2 Aug., 1906: "Mrs. R. H. Farr has been very sick the past week. Their daughter, Mrs. Parody and husband came Saturday and she will remain for a time." 6 Sept., 1906: "Mrs. R. H. Farr started Tuesday for Bennington, where she will visit in the family of Dr. Dill for a short time. Floyd going to Bellows Falls while she is away." 24 April, 1907: "Mrs. R. H. Farr went to Bellows Falls Tuesday night on her way to Brattleboro to see her son Leon, who is out of health."-23 May, 1907: "Leon Farr came to his home here Saturday night from Brattleboro where he has been for treatment." 30 May, 1907: "Leon Farr returned Monday to Brattleboro for further treatment. He is much improved since taking treatment." 20 June, 1907: "Leon Farr came home from Brattleboro Thursday night much worse than when he went away about two or three weeks ago." 18 July, 1907: Leon Farr is at his father's very much improved in health." 1 Aug., 1907: "R. H. Farr and wife went Friday to New London, NH for a few days visit in the family of L. A. French. Leon, their son, went Tuesday morning for a visit in the some family."

Proctorsville, 5 March, 1908: "R. H. Farr went Tuesday to Bellows Falls where he expects to work if he likes the position, in the machine shop." He was 56 years old at this time, and apparently still quite able to do heavy work. 23 April, 1908: "Mrs. Russell Farr has gone to Bellows Falls for a few weeks. Mr. Farr has been working in a machine shop there for some time." - 4 June, 1908: "R. H. Farr, who has been working in Bellows Falls, came home last Friday returning Sunday on the paper train." - 9 July, 1908: R. Farr came home last Friday from Bellows Falls for a few days stay, returning on Wednesday." - 3 Sept., 1908: "R. H. Farr came home sick Monday from Bellows Falls." - 8 Oct., 1908: "Several friends gathered at the home of Mr. & Mrs. R. H. Farr on Monday evening to remind them it was the anniversary of their marriage 34 years ago. A pleasant evening was passed in games, singing, etc." 31 Dec., 1908: "R. H. Farr who has been working in Bellows Falls, and his daughter Mabel Parody and her husband, were all home for Christmas this year." 18 Feb. 1909: "The Ladies' Aide Society of the Methodist church will meet Wednesday afternoon, Feb. 24, at the home of Mrs. R. H. Farr. A cordial invitation to all." 11 March, 1909: "Russell Farr was home from Bellows Falls over Sunday." 25 March, 1909: "Mrs. Mabel Parody from Bellows Falls is at her father's, R. H. Farr's called here by the illness of her mother." - 22 April, 1909 "R. H. Farr came home from Bellows Falls last Friday and is an the sick list." 29 April, 1909: "Russell Farr is able to walk out after a severe attack of the grip." 6 May, 1909. "Russell Farr has recovered from his recent illness and gone to work in the mill." 22 July, 1909: "Mrs. R. H. Farr is sick and under the Dr.'s care." 29 July, 1909: "Mrs. Mabel Parody of Bellows Falls came Tuesday evening to visit her parents. Her mother, Mrs. Farr, is very feeble." - 5 Aug., 1909: "Mrs. R. H. Farr is improving, and her daughter, Mrs. Parody when to Middletown last Friday to visit Mr. Parody's mother." 23 Sept., 1909. "While digging potatoes lost Saturday, R. H. Farr found two that weighed three pounds; one of the Green Mountain variety weighed one pound and ten ounces." - 30 Dec., 1909: "Mrs. Loriman A. French (Kate) and her daughter Miss Faye from New London, NH come Tuesday to visit Mrs. R. H. Farr and other friends. They were farmer residents here."


Russell H. Farr . His Life Without his Beloved Susie
and His Own Death

Ludlow, 13 June, 1918: Among those present at the Masonic meetings in Burlington this week were Rev. W. J. Ballou, Charles Josselyn, Frank Whelden and Russell Farr of Proctorsville. The three last mentioned made the trip in Mr. Whelden's car.' - (and under same date in Proctors- yule news): 'Russell Farr is on a two weeks vacation from his duties at the mill. He expects to attend Grand Lodge in Burlington and also visit friends in Maynard and Boston Massachusetts.:: 5 Sept., 1918: "Frank Williams of Rutland spent Friday afternoon with his mother, Mrs. Eliza Williams, at Russell Farm. 7 Nov., 1918: 'Mrs. Eliza McNulty Williams of Maiden, who has been acting as housekeeper for Russell Parr for some time, has returned home. Russell Parr returned on Monday from a short visit spent with friends in Massachusetts.'

The Grand Lodge of Masons meeting at Burlington showed a total state membership of 15,000 with 103 active lodges in the state. Don C. Pollard and Charles Whitcomb, cashier of the Block River Bank in Proctorsville were very prominent in the State organization. Mr. Whitcomb was elected grand treasurer at this meeting, and Mr. Pollard second associate chief of the Masonic Veterans Association. Mr. Farr voted for both of them and was pleased with their election.

29 Aug., 1918: "Mrs. Fred Simpson of Melrose, and Ms. Eliza Williams of Malden, are at the home of Russell Farr. Mrs. Williams is to remain all winter."-26 Dec., 1918: "Among those on the sick lint in Proctornville are Russell Farr, Mr. and Mrs. Lloyd McNulty, Miss Katherine Rollin- son and Mr. & Mrs. Bert Hutchinson and their little son." - 1 May, 1919, 'A telephone has been installed at the home of Russell Farr, in Proctorsville, ring 2-42." - 12 June, 1919: "Russell Farr and other Masons of Proctorsville are attending the meetings of the Grand Lodge in Burlington this week.' - 19 June, 1919: 'R. H. Parr visited in Greenfield, Mass., at the home of Mr. & Mrs. Charles Parody from Thursday until Sunday." 4 Sept., 1919: "Floyd Parr has been home from North Billerica, Mass., visiting with his father for a few days."

Russell was token serious ill Thursday evening, 6 Nov., 1919 and was rushed to the Bellows Foils hospital on Friday at noontime where he was operated on in the afternoon for gall stones. The operation was considered a success until peritonitis developed and he died early Monday morning, 10 Nov., 1919.

"His body was brought to his old Proctorsville home Monday afternoon and the funeral was held on Wednesday afternoon. He was the Master Lafayette Lodge F. and A. M. at the time of his death, and Post Grand of Mount Sinai Lodge, and a member of Myrtle Rebekah Lodge, I. 0. 0. F. Rev. F. T. Clark of Ludlow officiated at his funeral and the Masonic burial services was given by High Priest Norris G. Hammond in a very impressive manner. The flora tribunes were many and beautiful, showing the esteem in which he was held. Mr. Parr will be missed by those who were associated with him in all his activities, both business and fraternal. The stores were closed and work in the Murdock mill was suspended during his funeral he having been employed in that mill almost continuously for the post 55 years. The tolling of the mill bell while the remains were being conveyed to their last resting place in Hillcrest cemetery, was a mark of respect which bespoke the esteem in which he was held by his employers and fellow workmen."

"We desire to thank those who in any way assisted us during the sickness and death of our beloved father. We are especially grateful for the many beautiful floral tributes and to those who so kindly offered the use of their cars. The closing of the stores and of the mill during the funeral ore marks of respect, which we deeply appreciate. Mr. & Mrs. Charles C. Parody, Mr. & Mrs. Leon R. Farr, Floyd E. Farr."

Susan "Susie" MCNULTY [scrapbook]-8581 was born 1 on 22 Nov 1857 in Mount Holly, Rutland, Vermont, United States. Susie married (MRIN:3781) Russell Horace FARR-8559 on 4 Oct 1874 in Proctorsville, Windsor, Vermont, United States.

The Death of Susie McNulty Farr 26 Feb., 1918

From Susie's obi uary: " The Proctorsville community was shocked and saddened to hear of her death on Tuesday afternoon after only a few days illness. The Methodist Episcopal church has lost one of its honored and respected members and our community has lost a dear friend and loved neighbor in the death of Mrs. Russell Farr. The pastor and church extend to the bereaved family who mourn thier sad loss our heartfelt sympathy in this their hour of bereavement. The funeral of Mrs. Russell Farr was held from the home Friday afternoon, March 1st, the Rev. G. G. Squire, officiating. Susie McNulty Farr was born in Mt. Holly, her parents moved here when she was a small child. She was one of the family of six children. She was married to Russell Farr and four children came to gladden their home, one dying while an infant. A number of years ago, both Mr. and Mrs. Farr united with the Methodist Church, she being a ready and willing worker. She was also a charter member of the Myrtle Rebekah Lodge, holding the office of Chaplain for a long time. Her cheery smile and loving words will be greatly missed in the Lodge room as well as by her large circle of friends. Mrs. Farr had been in poor health for the last year, but was confined to the bed only a week. Although very sick, her death was unexpected. The unusually large assortment of floral tributes spoke of many sympathizing and sorrowing friends. She leaves her husband, two sons, and a daughter, two brothers and two sisters to cherish her memory. Those called here by her illness and death were Mr. and Mrs. Charles Parody and Mrs. Williams of Maiden, [Mass]; Mrs. Thomas Morgan of Rutland; Mrs. Alice Parody of Middletown Springs; Mrs. W. P. Bowman of Springfield, Mass.; Mr. and Mrs. Guy Matavia and Mrs. Ethel Karney of Ludlow; E. C. Brown of Springfield and Charles Brown of Amsden."

Another tribute to Susie was printed in the newspaper singed simply by "A Friend" which read: "Mrs. Farr has passed away and in passing, her community has suffered a great loss. She was a woman of rare qualities, always bright and cheerful and ever imparting her optimism to those about her. She was always mindful of the needs and comforts of others. Strong and courageous she faced the duties of life, and she will ever remain as a beautiful example, in the minds of those who knew her best."

From her family: "We wish to extend our sincere thanks to all who expressed sympathy by word or deed during our recent sorrow, to all who rendered assistance in nay way, and especially to those who contributed the beautiful flowers which she loved so well. Russell H. Farr, Mr. & Mrs. C. C. Parody, Mr. & Mrs. Leon R. Farr, Floyd E. Farr."

And this from the Myrtle Rebekah Lodge: "Whereas, God in his infinite wisdom has seen fit to sever by death the fraternal chain which bound us to our beloved sister, Susie M. Farr, charter member of Myrtle Rebekah Lodge, No. 6, I. 0. 0. F.; Resolved. That in the loss of Sister Farr, the lodge has lost one who had endeared herself to all by her genial presence and happy disposition, who was every ready with sympathy and aid to all in affliction or distress, and yet we are comforted by the Christian character she exemplified and rejoice that she has passed from all the trials of life to the rewards promised to the faithful in the great beyond. Resolved. That while we extend our sympathy to the bereaved husband and family of our deceased sister, in respect to her memory, that our charger be draped for the period of thirty days and these resolutions be spread upon the records of our lodge, printed in the Vermont Tribune, and that a copy be sent to the family of our departed sister. She will never be forgotten. Never shall her memory fade. Sweetest thoughts will always linger, Around the grave where she is laid. Ann S. Parker, Lucinda Masterson, Elizabeth D. Piper, Committee on Resolutions."

They had the following children.

  F i Mabel Emma "Mae" FARR-8582 was born on 24 Jan 1876. She died on 31 Aug 1968.
  M ii Leon Russell FARR-8583 was born on 16 Dec 1881. He died on 14 Aug 1944.
  M iii
Arthur Foster FARR-8584 was born on 30 Dec 1888 in Proctorsville, Windsor, Vermont, United States. He died on 26 Aug 1889 in Proctorsville, Windsor, Vermont, United States from of cholera.
  M iv Floyd Ernest FARR-8585 was born on 20 Sep 1892. He died on 4 Dec 1965 from of a pulmonary abscess.

Peter THOMAS-9266 was born in 1846 in Pittsford, Rutland, Vermont, United States. Peter married (MRIN:3782) Eliza Harriet FARR "Elsie"-8560 on 17 Aug 1867 in Pittsford, Rutland, Vermont, United States.

Eliza Harriet "Elsie" FARR [Parents] 1-8560 was born 2 in 1850 in Cavendish, Windsor, Vermont, United States. Elsie married (MRIN:3782) Peter THOMAS-9266 on 17 Aug 1867 in Pittsford, Rutland, Vermont, United States.

From letter of Mary French to her brother George B. French dated May 1, 1866:  "...  Uncle Burbank's folks [Abel and Almira (Blood) Burbank] have got a new hired girl.  Miss Elsie, daughter of Horace Farr, Esq. of this village and niece to Miss Sally Farr!  Don't hardly know how they will like her, she is not quite as old as Clara."


Francis Steven FARR (twin) [Parents] 1-8561 was born 2 on 11 Jan 1863 in Cavendish, Windsor, Vermont, United States. Francis married (MRIN:3783) Jennie Jesmie WEIGHTMAN-8571 on 5 Mar 1887 in Chester, Windsor, Vermont, United States.

Other marriages:
LEGACY, Nellie

From the research of Linda Farr Welch:

Francis was a member of the Proctorsville cornet brass band and played the saxophone. This band gave many musical entertainments at the town hall and social dances around the vicinity.  Liberation Notice: Proctorsville, Vt. 4 April, 1883: “This is to certify that I have this day given my son Francis S., his time during the remainder of his minority, and shall claim none of his wages nor pay any debts of his contracting after this date.  -Horace B. Farr.”   -Cavendish, 21 April, 1893: “Francis Farr and Miss Nellie Legacy returned from a three days visiting trip Wednesday evening.  We understand they were married while absent.”

Nellie died in Amsden, Vt. 16 Jan., 1908. “Green grows the grass above thee, Friend of my earlier days; None knew thee but to love thee, None named thee but to praise.”

Her remains were brought to Cavendish from Amsden for burial on Saturday. From her obituary: “Mrs. Farr died last Thursday and was buried Saturday.  She had been an invalid for some time and was taken fatally sick with winter cholera.”

-NEWS: Perkinsville, 20 Feb., 1908: “Lower Perkinsville was badly damaged by the ice during the thaw.  About midnight  Saturday an avalanche of ice, trees, and other debris, came rushing into the highway, just above the lower village, with a crash that frightened people form their slumber and brought them out to see what was the matter.  The old boarding house occupied by Mr. Farr was surrounded by water and the little children had to be carried out.” - When the 1910 census was taken, Francis (age 47), was a widower, living in Perkinsville with his children Walter (age 14), George (age 11), and Earnest (age 10). Francis was working as a 'sawyer' in the soap-stone shop. The three boys were attending the local school.  -Perkinsville, 26 Dec., 1912: “Myron Davis has sold his place in Perkinsville to Francis Farr and will soon move to Whitesville in Cavendish where he recently bought the blacksmith shop of Geo. F. Rand from Elliot White.”

Jennie Jesmie WEIGHTMAN-8571 was born in 1870 in Weathersfield, Windsor, Vermont, United States. She died on 9 Apr 1891 in Proctorsville, Windsor, Vermont, United States from of consumption. She was buried in Springfield, Windsor, Vermont, United States. Jennie married (MRIN:3783) Francis Steven FARR (twin)-8561 on 5 Mar 1887 in Chester, Windsor, Vermont, United States.

They had the following children.

  M i
Charles Francis FARR-8573 was born 1 on 2 Dec 1887 in Chester, Windsor, Vermont, United States.
  F ii
Alice Eliza FARR-8574 was born 1 on 27 Feb 1891. She died 2 in Feb 1975 in Springfield, Windsor, Vermont, United States.

DEATH: Surname on SSDI record is Sundgred.

Francis Steven FARR (twin) [Parents] 1-8561 was born 2 on 11 Jan 1863 in Cavendish, Windsor, Vermont, United States. Francis married (MRIN:3784) Nellie LEGACY-8572 on 17 Apr 1893 in Perkinsville, Windsor, Vermont, United States.

Other marriages:
WEIGHTMAN, Jennie Jesmie

From the research of Linda Farr Welch:

Francis was a member of the Proctorsville cornet brass band and played the saxophone. This band gave many musical entertainments at the town hall and social dances around the vicinity.  Liberation Notice: Proctorsville, Vt. 4 April, 1883: “This is to certify that I have this day given my son Francis S., his time during the remainder of his minority, and shall claim none of his wages nor pay any debts of his contracting after this date.  -Horace B. Farr.”   -Cavendish, 21 April, 1893: “Francis Farr and Miss Nellie Legacy returned from a three days visiting trip Wednesday evening.  We understand they were married while absent.”

Nellie died in Amsden, Vt. 16 Jan., 1908. “Green grows the grass above thee, Friend of my earlier days; None knew thee but to love thee, None named thee but to praise.”

Her remains were brought to Cavendish from Amsden for burial on Saturday. From her obituary: “Mrs. Farr died last Thursday and was buried Saturday.  She had been an invalid for some time and was taken fatally sick with winter cholera.”

-NEWS: Perkinsville, 20 Feb., 1908: “Lower Perkinsville was badly damaged by the ice during the thaw.  About midnight  Saturday an avalanche of ice, trees, and other debris, came rushing into the highway, just above the lower village, with a crash that frightened people form their slumber and brought them out to see what was the matter.  The old boarding house occupied by Mr. Farr was surrounded by water and the little children had to be carried out.” - When the 1910 census was taken, Francis (age 47), was a widower, living in Perkinsville with his children Walter (age 14), George (age 11), and Earnest (age 10). Francis was working as a 'sawyer' in the soap-stone shop. The three boys were attending the local school.  -Perkinsville, 26 Dec., 1912: “Myron Davis has sold his place in Perkinsville to Francis Farr and will soon move to Whitesville in Cavendish where he recently bought the blacksmith shop of Geo. F. Rand from Elliot White.”

Nellie LEGACY-8572 was born in Cavendish, Windsor, Vermont, United States. She died on 16 Jan 1908 in Amsden, Windsor, Vermont, United States. Nellie married (MRIN:3784) Francis Steven FARR (twin)-8561 on 17 Apr 1893 in Perkinsville, Windsor, Vermont, United States.

They had the following children.

  F i
Amanda FARR-8575 was born on 1 Feb 1894 in Windsor, Vermont, United States. She died on 6 Feb 1894 in Windsor, Vermont, United States.
  M ii
Walter Henry FARR 1-8576 was born 2 on 5 Dec 1895 in Windsor, Vermont, United States.



From the research of Linda Farr Welch:

On 5 June, 1917, Walter signed his W. W. I Draft Registration card at the age 0f 21 years.  He was born in Cavendish, was a farmer, employed at the farm of John H. Hicks in Weathersfield, Vt. He was single at the time. He was short, medium built, with blue eyes and brown hair. When the 1910 census was taken, Walter was of Weathersfield (Windsor Co)  Vt, living in the village of Perkinsville with his father:  Francis S. Farr (age 47, widower, sawyer in the soap stone shop),  Walter Farr (age 14, farm laborer, working out), George Farr (age 11), Ernest Farr (age 10).  When the 1920 Census of Hartford (Windsor Co) Vt. was taken we find: Walter H. Farr (age 24, b. Vt., napper, works in woolen mill), Lottie (wife, age 20, b. NY), Dorothy R. (b. NY age 2 yrs 5 mos).
  F iii
Marion G. FARR 1-8577 was born 2 on 23 Sep 1896 in Windham, Windham, Vermont, United States.
  M iv
George Edward "Georgie" FARR 1-8578 was born 2, 3 on 22 Aug 1898 in Windsor, Vermont, United States. He died 4 in Sep 1963 in Vermont, United States.



From the reseach of Linda Farr Welch:

NEWS:-Amsden, 22 Nov., 1906: “Amsden schools, District #11, closed a very pleasant term with ... [among those] in perfect attendance, Walter Farr; and absent two days or less, Marion and Georgie Farr."  On 2 Dec., 1936, George applied for a social security account number. He was 38 years old at the time and living in Quechee, Vt., employed at A. G. Dewey Company. George D. Sept., 1863. (SS#008-09-5177).

When the 1920 census was taken, Walter Hartford (Windsor Co) Vt. George E. Farr (b. Vt. age 21, stripper in the woolen mill), Ernest G. Farr (b. Vt. age 20, carder in the woolen mill), both boarders and single, living in the boarding house on Main Street of Albert E. & Mary Wilson.
  M v
Ernest Gordon FARR 1-8579 was born 2, 3 on 10 Dec 1899 in Windsor, Vermont, United States. He died 4 in Nov 1979 in Brattleboro, Windham, Vermont, United States.



From the research of Linda Farr Welch:

He was living in Hartford, Vt. in 1910 in a boarding house with his bother George, they both were employed at Dewey Company in Quechee Mills in the clothing factory. In 1930, Ernest was an inmate at the Waterbury State Hospital. He later lived in Brattleboro, Vt. where he d. Nov., 1979.

On Sept. 12, 1918, Ernest Gordon Farr (age 18), b. 10 Dec., 1899; Permanent Address: Dewey's Mills, Quechee, Vt., Mill hand.  Nearest Relative: Francis Stephen Farr, whose address was also at Dewey's Mills, Quechee, Vermont.  He was short, slender built, blue eyes, brown hair. Social Security Death Index: 009-38-640, lived in Brattleboro, Vt. where he d. Nov., 1979.

Franklin John FARR (twin) [Parents] 1-8562 was born 2 on 11 Jan 1863 in Cavendish, Windsor, Vermont, United States. Franklin married (MRIN:3785) Mary Louise SIMONNEAU-8564 on 7 Jun 1890 in Claremont, Sullivan, New Hampshire, United States.

Other marriages:
LOCKWOOD, Anna Maria (Fish)
FOSTER, Mary May (Underwood)

From the research of Linda Farr Welch:

NEWS: -Whitesville, 29 Jan., 1897:  “Frank Farr and wife are working for Wallace Shaw.”  When the 1900 census was taken, Frank and Mary were living in Ludlow Village. They had been married 11 years and had three children: Vergie (age 9), Frank (age 7), and Vernie (age 3). Frank was working in the woolen mill as a woolen presser. -Proctorsville, 16 Jan., 1903:  “Two of Frank Farr's children are sick with the smallpox.  It is supposed that they contracted the disease from a man visiting there two weeks ago who came here directly from the Claremont pest house.  The selectmen have purchased the Lovejoy farm on Stoddard hill for a pest house.”  Franklin removed his family and household goods to Claremont, NH, Aug., 1903 and went to work as a operator in the woolen mill there.  NEWS:-Cavendish, 24 Nov., 1905: Frank Farr of Proctorsville has moved into Gay's small house on Tarbell flat.  Frank and Mary Louise were divorced in May of 1907.   Mary had taken their two little children and gone to live with Jeffrey Mayotte at Norwich, Vt. in May of 1906. Mr. Mayotte was 30 in 1910, single, and boarding in Claremont, NH where he was working as a day laborer. Mary Louise and Frank reconciled, but it did not last.  They were divorced in May, 1907.  Frank m. 2nd in 1910, Anna Maria Fish Lockwood (b. Chester, 12 March, 1877, dau. of Akron & Maggie (Campbell) Fish, and divorced from her 1st husband, Addison A. Lockwood, whom she m. in Chester, 1 Jan., 1895.  Her first husband Addison was age 44 when they were married, and Anna was only 17 years old.  Anna had five children by this first marriage: (1) Frank “Frankie” Addison Lockwood, b. Chester 3 June, 1896, who moved to Clinton, Massachusetts; (2). Edith Anna Lockwood (b. April, 1897) (3) Ida May Lockwood (b. May, 1899); (3) Bertha E. Lockwood (b. 1902); (4) Esther E. Lockwood (b.   1906). When the 1910 census of Chester, was taken, Horace Farr (age 16, son of Frank Farr) and Vernie Emma Farr (age 13) were living with them, and also Anna's father, Akron F. Fish, a widower at age 62. They lived on the North Springfield Road.  Frank m. 2nd (or 3rd) at Claremont --- Mary "May"  (Underwood) Foster, (divorced from her 1st husband, Edward Foster).  They moved to Perkinsville where Franklin worked as a harness maker and repaired shoes.  Frank was an old ham at playing the violin, or "fiddle" as it was termed in the early days.  NEWS: -Amsden, 29 Sept., 1921: “Charles Parody and wife of Greenfield, Mass., and Frank Farr and family of Rochdale, Mass, visited at Elwin Brown's in Amsden recently.” - 3 April, 1925: Frank Farr is moving his family into the house in Perkinsville formerly occupied by Norman Clark. Frank and May removed to Henniker, NH.  While living in Henniker, Frank played his violin on the radio for an amateur hour and was very proud of his achievement.    [note:  Maximin Simonneau, b. Canada, --, son of --.  m. -- Josephine Dumas (b. Canada--).  They had child Joseph Herbert Simonneau, b. Claremont, 19 Jan., 1892, d. 31 Dec., 1892]

Mary Louise SIMONNEAU-8564 was born in Sep 1871 in Sherbrooke, Quebec, Canada. Mary married (MRIN:3785) Franklin John FARR (twin)-8562 on 7 Jun 1890 in Claremont, Sullivan, New Hampshire, United States.

They had the following children.

  F i
Virgie Mary FARR-8567 was born 1 on 8 Jul 1890 in Claremont, Sullivan, New Hampshire, United States.
  M ii
Horace Frank FARR-8568 was born 1 on 1 Aug 1892 in Claremont, Sullivan, New Hampshire, United States.



From the research of Linda Farr Welch:

Horace filled out his World War I draft registration card at Claremont, NH, 5 June, 1917. He was 25 years old, a machinist, unemployed at the time, and married with one child. He stated that he had previous military service. He had served as a private in the New Hampshire National Guard for three years. He was short in stature, medium build, with brown eyes and brown hair. On 10 Dec., 1936, Horace applied for a social security account number. At the time he was 47 years old and living at 368 Davis Street, Greenfield, Massachusetts, and working for a company called Daignault's Ex. Inc.  Horace d. in Greenfield, Mass., Jan., 1975. (Social Security# 016-07-2428)
  F iii
Vernie Emma FARR-8569 was born 1 on 23 Feb 1897 in Whitesville, Windsor, Vermont, United States.
  F iv Carrie May FARR-8570.

Franklin John FARR (twin) [Parents] 1-8562 was born 2 on 11 Jan 1863 in Cavendish, Windsor, Vermont, United States. Franklin married (MRIN:3786) Anna Maria (Fish) LOCKWOOD-8565 in 1910.

Other marriages:
SIMONNEAU, Mary Louise
FOSTER, Mary May (Underwood)

From the research of Linda Farr Welch:

NEWS: -Whitesville, 29 Jan., 1897:  “Frank Farr and wife are working for Wallace Shaw.”  When the 1900 census was taken, Frank and Mary were living in Ludlow Village. They had been married 11 years and had three children: Vergie (age 9), Frank (age 7), and Vernie (age 3). Frank was working in the woolen mill as a woolen presser. -Proctorsville, 16 Jan., 1903:  “Two of Frank Farr's children are sick with the smallpox.  It is supposed that they contracted the disease from a man visiting there two weeks ago who came here directly from the Claremont pest house.  The selectmen have purchased the Lovejoy farm on Stoddard hill for a pest house.”  Franklin removed his family and household goods to Claremont, NH, Aug., 1903 and went to work as a operator in the woolen mill there.  NEWS:-Cavendish, 24 Nov., 1905: Frank Farr of Proctorsville has moved into Gay's small house on Tarbell flat.  Frank and Mary Louise were divorced in May of 1907.   Mary had taken their two little children and gone to live with Jeffrey Mayotte at Norwich, Vt. in May of 1906. Mr. Mayotte was 30 in 1910, single, and boarding in Claremont, NH where he was working as a day laborer. Mary Louise and Frank reconciled, but it did not last.  They were divorced in May, 1907.  Frank m. 2nd in 1910, Anna Maria Fish Lockwood (b. Chester, 12 March, 1877, dau. of Akron & Maggie (Campbell) Fish, and divorced from her 1st husband, Addison A. Lockwood, whom she m. in Chester, 1 Jan., 1895.  Her first husband Addison was age 44 when they were married, and Anna was only 17 years old.  Anna had five children by this first marriage: (1) Frank “Frankie” Addison Lockwood, b. Chester 3 June, 1896, who moved to Clinton, Massachusetts; (2). Edith Anna Lockwood (b. April, 1897) (3) Ida May Lockwood (b. May, 1899); (3) Bertha E. Lockwood (b. 1902); (4) Esther E. Lockwood (b.   1906). When the 1910 census of Chester, was taken, Horace Farr (age 16, son of Frank Farr) and Vernie Emma Farr (age 13) were living with them, and also Anna's father, Akron F. Fish, a widower at age 62. They lived on the North Springfield Road.  Frank m. 2nd (or 3rd) at Claremont --- Mary "May"  (Underwood) Foster, (divorced from her 1st husband, Edward Foster).  They moved to Perkinsville where Franklin worked as a harness maker and repaired shoes.  Frank was an old ham at playing the violin, or "fiddle" as it was termed in the early days.  NEWS: -Amsden, 29 Sept., 1921: “Charles Parody and wife of Greenfield, Mass., and Frank Farr and family of Rochdale, Mass, visited at Elwin Brown's in Amsden recently.” - 3 April, 1925: Frank Farr is moving his family into the house in Perkinsville formerly occupied by Norman Clark. Frank and May removed to Henniker, NH.  While living in Henniker, Frank played his violin on the radio for an amateur hour and was very proud of his achievement.    [note:  Maximin Simonneau, b. Canada, --, son of --.  m. -- Josephine Dumas (b. Canada--).  They had child Joseph Herbert Simonneau, b. Claremont, 19 Jan., 1892, d. 31 Dec., 1892]

Anna Maria (Fish) LOCKWOOD-8565 was born on 12 Mar 1877 in Chester, Windsor, Vermont, United States. Anna married (MRIN:3786) Franklin John FARR (twin)-8562 in 1910.


Franklin John FARR (twin) [Parents] 1-8562 was born 2 on 11 Jan 1863 in Cavendish, Windsor, Vermont, United States. Franklin married (MRIN:3787) Mary May (Underwood) FOSTER-8566.

Other marriages:
SIMONNEAU, Mary Louise
LOCKWOOD, Anna Maria (Fish)

From the research of Linda Farr Welch:

NEWS: -Whitesville, 29 Jan., 1897:  “Frank Farr and wife are working for Wallace Shaw.”  When the 1900 census was taken, Frank and Mary were living in Ludlow Village. They had been married 11 years and had three children: Vergie (age 9), Frank (age 7), and Vernie (age 3). Frank was working in the woolen mill as a woolen presser. -Proctorsville, 16 Jan., 1903:  “Two of Frank Farr's children are sick with the smallpox.  It is supposed that they contracted the disease from a man visiting there two weeks ago who came here directly from the Claremont pest house.  The selectmen have purchased the Lovejoy farm on Stoddard hill for a pest house.”  Franklin removed his family and household goods to Claremont, NH, Aug., 1903 and went to work as a operator in the woolen mill there.  NEWS:-Cavendish, 24 Nov., 1905: Frank Farr of Proctorsville has moved into Gay's small house on Tarbell flat.  Frank and Mary Louise were divorced in May of 1907.   Mary had taken their two little children and gone to live with Jeffrey Mayotte at Norwich, Vt. in May of 1906. Mr. Mayotte was 30 in 1910, single, and boarding in Claremont, NH where he was working as a day laborer. Mary Louise and Frank reconciled, but it did not last.  They were divorced in May, 1907.  Frank m. 2nd in 1910, Anna Maria Fish Lockwood (b. Chester, 12 March, 1877, dau. of Akron & Maggie (Campbell) Fish, and divorced from her 1st husband, Addison A. Lockwood, whom she m. in Chester, 1 Jan., 1895.  Her first husband Addison was age 44 when they were married, and Anna was only 17 years old.  Anna had five children by this first marriage: (1) Frank “Frankie” Addison Lockwood, b. Chester 3 June, 1896, who moved to Clinton, Massachusetts; (2). Edith Anna Lockwood (b. April, 1897) (3) Ida May Lockwood (b. May, 1899); (3) Bertha E. Lockwood (b. 1902); (4) Esther E. Lockwood (b.   1906). When the 1910 census of Chester, was taken, Horace Farr (age 16, son of Frank Farr) and Vernie Emma Farr (age 13) were living with them, and also Anna's father, Akron F. Fish, a widower at age 62. They lived on the North Springfield Road.  Frank m. 2nd (or 3rd) at Claremont --- Mary "May"  (Underwood) Foster, (divorced from her 1st husband, Edward Foster).  They moved to Perkinsville where Franklin worked as a harness maker and repaired shoes.  Frank was an old ham at playing the violin, or "fiddle" as it was termed in the early days.  NEWS: -Amsden, 29 Sept., 1921: “Charles Parody and wife of Greenfield, Mass., and Frank Farr and family of Rochdale, Mass, visited at Elwin Brown's in Amsden recently.” - 3 April, 1925: Frank Farr is moving his family into the house in Perkinsville formerly occupied by Norman Clark. Frank and May removed to Henniker, NH.  While living in Henniker, Frank played his violin on the radio for an amateur hour and was very proud of his achievement.    [note:  Maximin Simonneau, b. Canada, --, son of --.  m. -- Josephine Dumas (b. Canada--).  They had child Joseph Herbert Simonneau, b. Claremont, 19 Jan., 1892, d. 31 Dec., 1892]

Mary May (Underwood) FOSTER-8566. Mary married (MRIN:3787) Franklin John FARR (twin)-8562.


Edwin C. BROWN-8580 was born on 1 Jun 1863 in Bridgewater, Windsor, Vermont, United States. He died on 4 Mar 1937 in Springfield, Windsor, Vermont, United States. Edwin married (MRIN:3788) Mary Anne FARR-8563 on 7 Apr 1883 in Perkinsville, Windsor, Vermont, United States.

Edwin was also known as Elwin Brown.

Mary Anne FARR [Parents] 1-8563 was born on 16 Mar 1866 in Cavendish, Windsor, Vermont, United States. She died in Jan 1937. Mary married (MRIN:3788) Edwin C. BROWN-8580 on 7 Apr 1883 in Perkinsville, Windsor, Vermont, United States.

From the research of Linda Farr Welch:

Cavendish, 8 Sept., 1905: “Ed Brown was badly hurt last week while at work in a deep ditch at John Stearns', by reason of a heavy stone rolling from the top and striking him in the small of the back, injuring the kidneys.”  Amsden, 3 Dec., 1908: “Edwin Brown and son Carl of Springfield were in town Monday on business.” - Amsden, 10 Aug., 1915: “Leon Farr and family and mother Mrs. Russell Farr of Proctorsville spent Sunday at E. C. Brown's.” - 7 Aug., 1921: “Mr. & Mrs. Charles Parody of Greenfield, Mass., are visiting her Aunt at E. C. Brown's.”

Edwin and Mary Ann lived in Amsden section of Weathersfield.  Mary Ann died in Perkinsville, Jan., 1937.  Elwin failed after his wife's death and had to be taken to the hospital at Springfield the next day as he had developed gangrene in one of his feet.  Elwin died in Springfield, 4 March, 1937.


Charles C. "Charlie" PARADY-8587 was born 1 in Dec 1873 in Vermont, United States. He died on 22 Apr 1942 in Connecticut, United States. Charlie married 2 (MRIN:3789) Mabel Emma FARR "Mae"-8582 on 18 May 1897 in Vermont, United States.

BIRTH: The census says 1872 but he was really born in 1873.

Mabel Emma "Mae" FARR [Parents] [scrapbook] 1-8582 was born 2, 3 on 24 Jan 1876 in Proctorsville, Windsor, Vermont, United States. She died 4 on 31 Aug 1968 in Ludlow, Windsor, Vermont, United States. Mae married 5 (MRIN:3789) Charles C. PARADY "Charlie"-8587 on 18 May 1897 in Vermont, United States.

From the research of Linda Farr Welch:

News of Auntie May: -Proctorsville, 14 Aug., 1891: “A curiosity of the vegetable kingdom was found a few days since, by Mabel Farr, while preparing some old potatoes for cooking. As she cut open one, she found imbedded in the center a new potato as large as a walnut, and as perfect in appearance as if dug from the ground.” - 3 Feb., 1893: “About twenty-five of the young people, friends of Mabel Farr, gave her a surprise party Wednesday evening, Jan. 25th, to celebrate her seventeenth birthday.” -2 Feb., 1894: “About twenty young people met at the home of Russell Farr one evening last week to celebrate the 18th birthday of his daughter, Mabel.”

-20 Sept., 1895: “Miss Lillie Piper and Mabel Farr went to Burlington as delegates to the State meeting of the Christian Endeavor society.”

-18 May, 1897: “a pretty home wedding took place at the home of Mr. & Mrs. Russell Farr on Tuesday evening at 6 o'clock when their daughter Mabel was married to Charles C. Parody. The ceremony was performed by the past of the Methodist Church, Rev. W. N. Roberts, in the presence of about fifty relatives and friends. The house was prettily decorated with plants and cut flowers. After the ceremony refreshments of cake and coffee were served. Later in the evening, the young couple were driven to Ludlow, where they were the guests of their friends, Mr. & Mrs. W. P. Bowman at the Gill Home. They took the noon train for Claremont where they will spend a few days after which they will return to Proctorsville. The presents were numerous and beautiful and attested the high esteem in which the bride and bridegroom are held. We are pleased to learn that Proctorsville is to be their future home.”

We learn from the Vt. Tribune that Mabel was “in the hospital at Rutland for treatment and is getting along well at the present time 9 Feb., 1900, and Mr. & Mrs. Russell Farr went to Rutland Saturday morning, returning Monday evening to visit with their daughters.” -9 March, 1900: “Mrs. Mabel Parody came home from Rutland last week and is gaining slowly.” - 31 Aug., 1900: “Mr. & Mrs. Parody, who had been spending the summer at Middletown Springs, returned to town last week.” -7 Dec., 1900: “ The many friends of Mrs. C. C. Parody will be glad to learn that she is gaining as fast as could be expected. Mr. Parody, who has been with his wife at Burlington, returned home Saturday night.” -22 Feb., 1901: “Mr. and Mrs. C.C. Parody have moved into the upper tenement of Mr. Eddy's house. Mr. Parody's mother is with them for the present.” -29 March, 1901: “Everyone rejoiced last Sunday to see Mrs. C.C. Parody back in the choir of the Methodist church. Mrs. Parody has been absent a long time from the choir on account of ill health. - 5 April, 1901: “Charles C. Parody went to Brattleboro last week Friday where he has secured a position in the insane asylum.” ” - 3 May, 1901: “Mrs. Parody, who has been at her son's for some time, returned to her home in Middletown Springs last week Thursday.” - 10 May, 1901: “C. C. Parody went last Friday to Bellows Falls where he had secured a position in a machine shop.” -4 Oct., 1901: “Charles Parody of Bellows Falls is spending a week's vacation in town. At the end of that time he and his wife will return to Bellows Falls where they will remain all winter.” -22 Nov., 1901: “Mrs. Mabel Parody of Bellows Falls came to town Friday last and will visit her parents, Mr. & Mrs. Russell Farr until after Thanksgiving.” -5 June, 1903: “Alice Davis, who is well known in this vicinity, and who has spent some time here of late in company with Frank H. Whitney of Springfield, started Wednesday morning for Bellows Falls, where at the home of Mr. & Mrs. Charles Parody, she and Mr. Whitney were united in marriage by Rev. W. N. Roberts.” -21 Aug., 1903: Mrs. Mabel Parody of Bellows Falls came to her father's R. H. Farr's on Wednesday to spend Old Home Day.” -27 Nov., 1903: “Mrs. Mabel Parody of Bellows Falls came to her father's R. H. Farr's Saturday to spend Thanksgiving. She was joined Wednesday evening by her husband, Charles Parody.” -29 April, 1904: “Mrs. Parody of Middletown, on her way to Essex Jct., stopped over Sunday with her sister, Mrs. Miner, who is quite sick.” -Proctorsville, 13 May, 1904: “Mr. & Mrs. Charles Parody were in town to attend the funeral of their aunt, Mrs. Ellen Miner. ["Mrs. Ellen Miner, who has been sick for several months with heart trouble and dropsy, fell from her chair, dying suddenly, Monday morning, 9 May, 1904. The funeral was held Sunday afternoon, Rev. McKenzie officiating. She is survived by a daughter and two sons, who were present at the funeral. The sons returned to their home in Danby Monday, taking their sister with them.”]

-10 June, 1904: “Mrs. Mabel Parody came last Wednesday to her father's R. H. Farr's called here by her mother's illness.” -15 July, 1904: “Mrs. Mabel Parody returned Monday morning to her home in Bellows Falls after a six weeks' stay at the father's R. H. Farr's, assisting her mother.” -22 Sept., 1905: “Charles Parody and wife of Bellows Falls came Saturday for a few days' visit with her parents, R. H. Farr, and wife, on their way to Rutland and Middletown Springs.” -29 Nov., 1906: “Mrs. Mabel Parody came Saturday from Middletown Springs to her father's R. H. Farr's where she will spend Thanksgiving.” -6 Dec., 1906: “Charlie Parody joined his wife at her father's, R. H. Farr's on Wednesday night to spend a few days, returning to Bellows Falls the last of the week.” -Proctorsville, 5 Dec., 1907: “Charles Parody and wife of Bellows Falls, spent Thanksgiving at her father's R. H. Farr's, the whole family being all together for the first time in seven years.” - 25 May, 1911: “Mrs. Mabel Parody has gone to Greenfield, Mass., to visit her husband who is now working there.” - 10 Sept., 1914: “Mrs. Charles Parody stopped at her father's R. H. Farr's last week on her way from Middletown Spa to her home in Greenfield, Mass.”  When the 1920 census was taken, Charles and Mabel were living in a rented house on Davis Street in Greenfield, Mass. Charles (age 47) was employed at the Tap & Die Corporation at the time. Mabel (age 43, was keeping house). When the 1930 census was taken, Charles (age 57), was working as an assembler in the tool factory. Mabel F. Parody (age 54), was not working, just keeping house.

Memories of Linda M. Welch: "My Auntie Mae was a stately proud and petite woman- but she had the Irish gleam in her eyes! We all called her "Auntie Mae". We never knew Charlie Parody, he died before I was born, but Auntie Mae would always talk about him with pure love in her eyes. My earliest recollections of Auntie Mae were visiting her on Sundays at the Gill Odd Fellows Mansion in Ludlow. To me, it was where she must have always lived, because I never saw her living in any other place. But she, of course - had. Her husband was a mechanic of sorts and when they lived in Greenfield, Connecticut, he worked for a machine company. After he died, she sold her house and gave her money to the Gill Odd Fellows and was given a home for life in Ludlow in that stately old place! What a simply wonderful place it was! Victorian to the ultimate and mahogany wood carving throughout! The staircase to me was like the grand staircase in "Gone with the Wind" and my twin brother and I used to have fun sliding down the banister before we were caught by someone and told to sit down and be quiet. There were usually elderly people in the 'sitting room' downstairs, playing cards or putting together puzzles on the big wood tables. The place always smelled of cinnamon and apples. They must have had a wonderful cook. Auntie Mae's room upstairs was cozy- she had a most wonderful bright-colored bed quilt. Her bed was high and had four posts- I think it must have been made of cherry wood. Her dressers and bed were part of a set. She had all kinds of fancy shawls and embroidered sweaters and beads I used to put on at her insistence when we all went to visit. She was not an invalid- I never remember her being so. She was able to get up and around with her cane and would get into the old elevator and go down to the ground floor with all of us at times. Her hair was always in a beautiful little pulled back bun with a hairnet covering it. She would take us to the adjoining rooms on the floor to visit other old folk. One woman I remember in particular was "Nellie", but I never knew her last name. Nellie was a joker and always had a funny story to tell. She and Aunt Mae were friends. My Daddy loved Aunt Mae. He always had tears in his eyes when it was time to say good-bye and come home. Of course, he loved Ludlow anyway, some of his best memories were spent in that town- but Auntie Mae had a special place in his heart being his deceased father's sister. She never wore a hearing aide and she was, at times, hard of hearing- that I do remember. I so wish I was smart enough then, on those visits, to have sit myself down with pencil and paper and asked Auntie Mae about the recollections of her own life. She would have told me everything I am so curious to know today and will probably never have the chance to learn now. Auntie Mae died when I was nineteen years old. I was not able to attend the funeral as I was on Monhegan Island in Maine working for the summer. However, one never forgets the image of childhood of someone who holds such endearment. I shall always remember her dignity- the way she carried herself and how she kept her faculties right up to the end. And I shall never forget the Gill Home in Ludlow- the old Gill Home that was a showplace, standing on the hill with its wide porches and rounded side widows- the winding road that took us up there in our old jalopy while I gazed out the window to catch a view of the place from the bottom of the hill. The Sunday afternoons visiting this place filled me as a child, with special memories of what it must be like to grow old and how much I was looking forward to it and especially spending my last days at the Gill Home where Auntie May lived! But alas, they tore the place down and now modern buildings dot the landscape of where once stood the most picturesque place in the town of Ludlow. I am grateful that my grandmother Farr gave me my Auntie May's small gold locket with her initials engraved on the front "MEP" in calligraphy. Inside the locket is a picture of my great grandfather Farr and great grandmother Susie McNulty. I will always treasurer it as a permanent loving connection to my Auntie May Parody."

My Auntie Mae and her husband Charlie Parody lived in Bellows Falls, and Greenfield, Conn.  Charlie died in Connecticut,  22 April, 1942.  Mae removed back to Ludlow, lived at the Gill Odd Fellows Home there until her death on 31 Aug., 1968 (age 92).


Leon Russell FARR [Parents] [scrapbook]-8583 was born 1, 2 on 16 Dec 1881 in Proctorsville, Windsor, Vermont, United States. He died on 14 Aug 1944 in Middletown, Middlesex, Connecticut, United States. Leon married 3, 4 (MRIN:3790) Mabel Emma FROST-8588 on 14 Aug 1909 in Concord, Merrimack, New Hampshire, United States.

From the research of Linda Farr Welch:

Leon Farr was born and raised in the village of Proctorsville. He attended the local school and later self-studied the nursing field. Mr. Farr worked at the Brattleboro Retreat from April, 1902 to 1906. He also worked in private duty practice for some time in Cavendish and Proctorsville.

FAMILY NEWS: -Proctorsville, 15 Dec., 1893: “Anyone wishing for a Boston Sunday Journal, can get it of Leon Farr.” -21 Aug., 1903: “Leon Farr who is at work at the Brattleboro Retreat for the insane, is spending his vacation at his father's Russell Farr's. While Leon and Harold Pickett were driving home from Ludlow Monday afternoon, their horse became frightened near the watering trough in Smithville, throwing them out and smashing up the carriage.” -28 Aug., 1903: Leon Farr returned to Bellows Falls Sunday to spend a day or two with his sister, Mrs. Parody before returning to his work in Brattleboro.” -8 July, 1904: “Leon Farr is taking a two weeks' vacation from his duties at the Brattleboro retreat and is at his father's R. H. Farr's.” -19 Jan., 1906: “Leon Farr came home from Brattleboro asylum on Friday night suffering from an abscess on his nose.” 26 March, 1908: “Leon Farr is caring for Mr. George S. Hill at the present time.” -10 Dec., 1908: “Leon Farr, who has been an attendant on Geo. S. Hill, finished work there December 1st., and Miss Helen Fitton is now taking care of her grandfather.”

Leon removed to Collinsville, Conn. and worked at the hospital there. Collinsville, a suburb of the city of Hartford, Conn., was a prosperous manufacturing village of 3,000 inhabitants in the year 1924. Often times when the Cavendish and Proctorsville mills shut down, their workers would find suitable employment in Collinsville and manufacturing centers like it.

-Cavendish, 9 Aug., 1906: “Leon Farr was at his home here from Collinsville, Conn., called by the serious illness of his mother.” -Proctorsville 12 Nov., 1908: “The supper and concert given by the Order of Woodmen last Friday evening was well attended and pronounced by all present a most enjoyable event. Supper was served in the dining hall from five until eight. The concert was held in the opera house and consisted of selections on the phonograph, duets by Helen M. Hudson and Leon R. Farr, soprano solos by Mrs. Charles Cook, and Misses May and Maude Mack, baritone solos by Rice M. Battey and Charles Parker. Mrs. Charles Parker presided at the piano during the evening.” -Proctorsville, 4 March, 1909: “Leon Farr left Monday morning for Concord, NH where he has a position in the insane asylum.”

The first time back to Proctorsville after his marriage in Aug., 1910 to Mabel Emma Frost, we learn on 17 March, 1910: “Mr. and Mrs. Leon Farr of Concord, NH are at his father's R. H. Farr's.” Mabel had been working as an attendant in a hospital at Concord, NH, where she and Leon, who also was working as an attendant, became acquainted, fell and love, and were married.

-Proctorsville, 25 May, 1911: “Mrs. Leon Farr and baby went to her home in Pepperell, Mass., last Saturday.” - 6 July, 1911: “Leon Farr moved his family into one of the Parker tenements in the old store building.” - 28 Dec., 1911: “Mrs. Leon Farr was seriously burned last week through the ignition of her gown by the head of a snap match which broke in lighting and started her clothing on fire. Mr. Farr was asleep in another room and upon hearing her cries he rushed to her aid and with quick work on the part of both, fatal results were averted. Her lower limbs and body were badly burned but not deep enough but that it is felt she will recover.” - 11 Jan., 1912: “At the latest report, Mrs. Leon Farr is improving.” - 30 April, 1914: “Miss Lill Frost from Pepperell, Mass., who has been on a two weeks' visit to her sister, Mrs. Leon Farr, went back to her home on Wednesday.”- 9 July, 1914: "Mrs. Leon Farr and two children have gone to Pepperell, Mass., to visit her mother.” - 8 Oct., 1914: “Leon Farr has returned after a three months absence much improved in health and has returned to his former position in the Proctorsville mill.” - 22 Oct., 1914: “Mrs. Leon Farr and two children who have spent the past few months with her mother, joined her husband here last Saturday.” - 2 Dec., 1914: “Leon Farr has finished work at the mill and is in Rutland this week with the agent, learning the routine and preparing to engage in the insurance business under the auspices of the Odd Fellows.” - 10 Dec. 1914: “Leon Farr has returned home and resumed work in the mill.”

- Proctorsville, 14 Feb., 1915: “Leon Farr has taken the agency for sanitary brushes for Fuller brush company, Hartford, Conn., and has Windham county for territory.” - 10 June, 1915: “Miss Lillian Frost of Pepperell, Mass. is visiting her sister, Mrs. Leon Farr.” - 8 July, 1915: “Mrs. Leon Farr visited her father in Waverly, Mass., over the Fourth.” - 16 Sept., 1915: “Leon Farr is working in Cook & Wells' market, having taken Fred Hart's place, and has moved his family to the Dix tenement on Main Street” - 26 Oct., 1916: “Cook & Wells have recently purchased an automobile delivery truck which they are using as a meat cart and have added Springfield to their route, Leon Farr as delivery man.” - 16 Nov., 1916: “Mrs. Leon Farr went to Pepperell, Mass. Wednesday to visit her mother who is in poor health.”- 22 Feb., 1917: “Mr. & Mrs. Leon Farr visited at her home in Pepperell, Mass. last week.” - 24 May, 1917: “Henry E. Frost of Waverly, Mass., is the guest of his daughter, Mrs. Leon Farr. Mr. Frost is having a vacation of two weeks from his duties as night supervisor at the McLean Hospital, a position he has held for thirty-nine years.” - 7 June, 1917: “Miss Seymour, who teaches school in Walpole, NH, was the guest of her former playmate, Mrs. Leon Farr over Sunday.” - 28 June, 1917: “Mrs. Leon Farr was called to her former home in Massachusetts the last of the week by the serious illness of her mother.”

- Proctorsville, 5 Sept., 1918: “The program for the coming week at the “Pastime” includes a Sunday evening performance of “Over the Top” featuring Guy Espey himself. The doors will open at 7:00 and from 7:45 until 8:15, Perry's orchestra of Springfield will give a concert. During the evening, Leon Farr will sing. Mrs. Leon Farr left Wednesday for a week's visit to her sister in Pepperell, Mass., and her mother in Worcester.” - 19 Dec., 1918: “L. E. Boyce and Wright Danforth have purchased the grocer and meat business hitherto conducted by W. L. Warner on Depot Street, Ludlow ,and are now carrying it on under the 'cash and carry' system. The store was closed all day yesterday for re-arrangement of the goods, and opened again this morning. Mr. Warner is to remain with the new firm for a few days and J. C. Gleason is also helping here.” - 23 Jan., 1919: “Mr. Henry Edgar Frost has come to Proctorsville from a visit with his son Edgar and daughter Lillian at East Pepperell, Mass. He is now visiting with his daughter Mrs. Leon Farr. He is very proud of his son Edgar Frost. He brought in an extract from the Pepperell News: “Edgar W. Frost is spending his furlough with his sister, Mrs. John B. Rodier. Mr. Frost enlisted in the naval reserves when war was declared. Having entered the Harvard Radio school, he volunteered to go across on the U. S. S. destroyer, Tucker on May 17, 1917. During his 19 months of service, he worked up from third class to first class and finally to chief radio operator. The Tucker was awarded a white star on her forward funnel for downing a submarine unaided.”

- Proctorsville, 30 Jan., 1919: “Leon Farr cut the thumb on his left hand severely while peddling meat for Cook & Wells in Ludlow on Saturday. He injured the bone, which makes it very painful.” - (under same date): “Mrs. Adeline Parker, D. D. P., and her marshal, Mrs. Mabel Farr, installed the officers of Amity Rebekah lodge in Bellows Falls Friday evening of Crystal Lodge Saxtons River Monday evening, and of Hope lodge of Chester, Tuesday evening.”- 20 Feb., 1919: “Fred Hart has returned to a position he had in Kent, Ohio, last fall, and Leon Farr has taken charge of the Cook & Wells store in Ludlow. Mrs. Leon Farr returned the first of the week from a visit with her sister, Mrs. John Rodier in Pepperell, Mass.” - 27 Feb., 1919: “Leon Farr, who injured his hand a short time ago, expects to have his thumb taken off this week.”- Proctorsville, 20 March, 1919: “Leon Farr has had a telephone installed in his house, 2-8.” - 1 May, 1919: “Mrs. Eliza (McNulty) Williams and Mrs. Leon Farr left here last Wednesday noon for Greenfield, Mass. Mrs. Farr returned Friday. Mrs. Williams was to continue her trip to Boston.” Ludlow, - 11 Sept., 1919: “Leon Farr of the local Cook & Wells market, is in Boston or the week. Fred Hart of Proctorsville is helping in the market in his absence.”

After his father's death in 1919, Leon and wife Mabel purchased the home and moved in right away, vacating the house they had rented.

-Proctorsville, 3 May, 1920: “Leon Farr is beautifying his home by the setting out of hydrangeas and rose bushes, pear and apple trees.” - 3 June, 1920: “When Leon Farr set out fruit trees a short time ago, in the 'wilds' of Proctorsville, he used dynamite in digging the holes. He says he did not linger near the holes to note the details of the digging process, but found when the dynamite was through with the dirt, in loosened in fine shape and now recommends this process to his neighbors, for large hole digging.”

Proctorsville, 15 July, 1920: “A Proctorsville Woman Writes of Her Trip Through The Air In An Airplane: “Mrs. Leon Farr of Proctorsville sends this description of a recent trip in an airplane: Mrs. Farr claims the distinction of being the only woman in the immediate vicinity who has been fortunate enough to travel by airplane and in anticipating the time when this will be a common mode of travel. The new mode of travel by airplane is a most delightful experience, though not all pleasant by any means, to those who are fortunate enough to have so thrilling an adventure. None of our party had any idea of taking a flight when we started for Kendrick's Corners, the landing place and aviation 'field'. When we arrived, Capt. Stickney, the aviator and his assistant, were adjusting a new propeller. It was not an ideal day for a flight, the weather being showery and with high winds. However, as they expected to make flights at Claremont, NH the following day, the place was given a try-out. Capt. Stickney going up alone the first trip. The spectators were treated to a thrill when the plane 'looped the loop.' In plain sight of all. He then carried three passengers, one at a time. I was the fourth passenger after signing a paper releasing the government from responsibility should any damage occur to my person or clothing during the flight. The assistant, having helped me to the seat, I was strapped in, and invested with an aviators cap and goggles. When the machine left the ground, I wished myself back on solid ground, but this feeling passed quickly and I became anxious to peer over at objects below. Suddenly it seemed as though we were not moving an inch, but just hanging in mid-air. How long it seemed as we passed over that mountain, facing a strong wind! Soon I began to follow the course of the river, railroad, and highways, and began to partially realize what was passing below us. Just before reaching Proctorsville, Capt. Stickney called my attention by pulling my cape and pointed toward the town. As Mr. Butler had sent word than an airplane was to fly over the town I felt sure some of the citizens were looking our way, but must confess I saw none. The trip back was delightful, with the wind at our backs, and we were at the landing place again, in a surprisingly short space of time, the entire trip being covered in 24 minutes.”

A few days after Mabel went flying in the plane, her husband Leon was in Plymouth, Vt. at the Coolidge reception, taking pictures for the Vermont Tribune newspaper of Calvin Coolidge's visit to the old homestead. One of the pictures he took appeared on the front page of the 22 July, 1920 issue. Leon took a good deal of pictures and held a 'show' of the event at Hammond Hall in Ludlow on Saturday evening, 24 July, 1920. Mabel Farr was very proud to have registered for the very first time to vote in the September primary election in Proctorsville, September 14, 1920- the very first year women were given the absolute right to vote. She was one of sixty-four women of Proctorsville who registered to vote and one of forty-three who cast their ballots that day in the village for the first time.

More news: - 7 Oct., 1920: “Leon Farr is taking a vacation from the Cook & Wells market and Ludlow, and with Mrs. Farr is visiting relatives in different parts of Massachusetts.”

It was announced in the newspaper that the Cook and Wells partnership was dissolved 20 July, 1920, as Charles M. Cook bought out Reuben O. Wells in the meat store business. - -4 Aug., 1921: “Mrs. John Rodier and Mr. & Mrs. Jesse Shattuck of Pepperell, Mass. have been the recent guests of Mrs. Rodier's sister, Mrs. Leon Farr.” -Ludlow, 17 Feb., 1922: “Dollar Days in Ludlow was a success. C. M. Cook offered bargains on Saturday and had a volume of business that exceeded his fondest hopes. The Cook market had sold out its supply on hand before evening and was obliged to replenish its refrigerator with more beef and pork to take care of the night trade. 'It was by far our best day in many months,' said Mr. Farr, the manager, when asked about his success.” - -11 Aug., 1922: “Most people have opinions of their own about flying in an airplane. Some are decidedly opposed to taking any changes in a dash through space; others would like to try it if they could keep one feet on terra firma. While some would welcome the opportunity to fly, even to the limit of emulating the tricksters in their 'loop-the-loops' and fancy 'dives.' Bill Donahue of Ludlow has an opinion with which all of us will agree. When Leon Farr pointed to the airplane circling over the town Wednesday morning and asked Mr. Donahue how he would like to be up there in it, the genial Irishman replied: “I would much rather be up there with it than without it.' “

Leon and Mabel removed to Ludlow, Vermont, where they bought a farm from George C. Parker of North Bennington, Vt., known as the Cynthia A. Orvis place, for $1,150, on April 27, 1923. This farm consisted of a dwelling and barn about two acres of land, bounded northerly and easterly by land of Harlan Graham; southerly by land of George H. Bennett; and westerly by the highway leading from Ludlow Village to Weston. An additional parcel of land they purchased at the same time lay across the highway from the home place and had ten acres of pasture land.

-Ludlow, 13 April, 1923: "Leon R. Farr, who has managed the meat market here, owned by C. M. Cook of Proctorsville for the past five years, has purchased the establishment from Mr. Cook, and took possession on the first day of the month. Mr. Farr had worked for the former owner for eight years at the time the sale was made- the first three of that time being employed in Proctorsville. The new proprietor will continue to handle the same quality of products as before and no immediate changes in the business are anticipated."  - 27 April, 1923: "Walter Hemenway, who has been employed in the Tribune office for the past eight months, finished work here Saturday, and will begin work on Monday for Leon Farr in the meat market. Lawrence Burney has been working in Farr's market this week." - Proctorsville, 4 May, 1923: "Through the Elwin Leach Agency, Arthur E. Rhodes has bought the Leon R. Farr place in Proctorsville, Mr. Farr as purchased the Chester A. Durphey's place on Andover Street in Ludlow. On Tuesday evening, Mr. and Mrs. Farr, who are soon to move to Ludlow, were presented by Mrs. Park Pollard on behalf of Rebekah Lodge, with a May basket in which was a ten dollar gold piece. Mr. Farr is past grand of Mt. Sinai Lodge, and Mrs. Farr is a past noble Grande of Myrtle Lodge. They have a large circle of friends who regret very much their leaving town."

-Proctorsville, 19 Sept., 1924: The next meeting of the Ladies' Aid will be held with Mrs. Leon Farr in Ludlow." - 3 Oct., 1924: "Seven members of the Ladies' Aid of Proctorsville, attended the work meeting held at the home of Mrs. Leon Farr last week, and report a very pleasant time. They made plans for the Harvest Supper to be held at the Opera House Friday evening, October 10th." - Ludlow, 20 Feb., 1925: "Mr. and Mrs. L. R. Farr were in Boston last week to see Mrs. Farr's cousin, Julian Eltinge, in a last appearance at Fenway's Theater. Mr. Eltinge is called the greatest artist in the country, if not the world, in the impersonations of female characters. He has often been called the 'most beautiful woman on the stage.'" - Ludlow, 30 April, 1926: "Mrs. J. W. Archibald, while making her first automobile trip of the season to Camp Plymouth on Tuesday, while some distance from the camp, her car bumped into a heap of snow which it could not negotiate and went so deep into the drift that it could neither go ahead or back. She then started on foot in the direction of Tyson for help, She met Leon Farr by the side of Echo Lake where their attention was drawn to an animal in distress in the water. At first sight it appeared to be a man or boy struggling for life. Finally the object gained a foothold on a cake of ice where it revealed itself as a splendid young fawn The creature soon lost its balance, however, and soon fell back into the water where it continued to struggle until it sank to the bottom of the lake. In the meantime, Mr. Farr had gone for aid and soon returned with A. H. LeBarr. The two men immediately set out in a boat in the hope of saving the young deer if possible, but were too late. Its body was secured and brought to shore, but life had departed. The fawn was supposed to have been driven into the lake by dogs, as two hounds were seen in the vicinity at the time. The game warden took possession of the body as the law requires." - 20 Aug., 1926: "Mr. and Mrs. Leon Farr and Mr. and Mrs. Leslie Cushman were in Springfield, Mass on Sunday to see Miss Helen Cushman, who has a position in that town. Miss Cushman returned with them for two weeks prior to going to Atlantic City, NJ, where she has a new position."

Leon had one of the first 'mobile meat markets' and grocery delivery trucks in town. He also leased a store (Farr's Market) in 1927 on the corner of Depot and Main Street in Ludlow, which was owned in 1898 by S. A. Hill of Ludlow. Leon operated the market until about 1929 when he went back to the nursing profession. His wife Mabel, was also a nurse. The stock market crash of 1929 proved hard for Leon as he had invested heavily in the market. Forcing to close his business in Ludlow, he sold his place in Ludlow on 20 April, 1937, and removed to Fair Haven (Rutland County) Vermont, to live with his son Russell, where he stayed until he went back to the nursing profession.

Leon died in Middletown, Conn. 14 Aug., 1944.  His widow, removed to Pepperell, Massachusetts where she worked at the McLean Hospital for many years and lived nearby her sister Lillian who had married John Rodier.   Mabel died at Pepperell, 13 April, 1972.

Memories of Linda M. Welch:  "Sadly, none of the four Farr grandkids  got to know our grandfather Farr.  He died of a heart attack five years before I was born.  My father had told me stories of grandfather Leon and my mother often told me that he spoiled my father and neglected to teach him the proper sense of responsibility!  I agree that my father must have been spoiled, but he was a delight and we all loved him so.  Grandma Farr was a very self sufficient and proud woman.  She was a nurse and worked for a living and had her own circle of friends and involvement in Pepperell where she lived.  We used to visit her in Pepperell and I always remember what a beautiful colonial town it was.  Now I have learned much about its historical past and it holds an even more special place in my memory.    Grandma was the President of the Golden Age Society of Pepperell and was responsible for organizing activities for the senior citizens there.  Her sister was my Aunt Lillian.  Aunt Lill was a character and had dyed red hair and wore tons of makeup and colorful jewelry- and she was in her 80s!  After her husband John Rodier died, she had many suitors and boyfriends.  They used to come up to the farm in the Fall time of the year to visit and it seemed she always had a different "friend" with her each time she came.  Gram Farr paid us many visits and at one time had her own room in our farmhouse  I cannot remember the particulars, but know we- the four Farr kids, were all very happy to have her living with us.  She left when and went back to work in nursing, and when she came to visit, she would always take the bus to Rutland and spend the night at the Bardwell House before Daddy drove down to pick her up and bring her up to the farm.  She always dressed with great care and had a wonderful figure.  She was a special lady- I think much of her character came from her "English" background.  Her mother, Mary Ellen Baker was the daughter of two English immigrants to America- Robert Baker and Maria Burkinshaw.   The Burkinshaw Family, Maria's parents, were from Sheffield, England and came to Pepperell, Massachusetts where they opened a knife factory and were quite prosperous.  Mr. Baker also came from Sheffield England, to work in the Burkinshaw Knife Factory and it was here he met and married Maria.  Their daughter, Mary Ellen Baker married Henry Edgar Frost from Norway, Maine, who was my great-grandfather.  My grandmother Farr was born in Sommerville, Massachusetts while her father was working as a Supervisor at the McLean Hospital- so she was introduced to the nursing profession at a very early age.    Grandma must have been devastated when her husband Leon died in 1944.   Her son Russell- my dad, was in military service at the time and was not able to come home for the funeral.   She made do with her life and went on with it- often times traveling to California to visit her daughter and granddaughter and great-grandchildren there.   She worked hard and was able to retire with a little pension.   She took up painting for a hobby and loved to paint Vermont scenes- especially foliage scenes.  I have a few of her oil paintings, and my sister Mary has a few also.   I was in California when she died and not able to attend her funeral."

Mabel Emma FROST [scrapbook]-8588 was born 1 on 25 Jun 1886 in Somerville, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States. She died 2 on 13 Apr 1972 in Ayer, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States. Mabel married 3, 4 (MRIN:3790) Leon Russell FARR-8583 on 14 Aug 1909 in Concord, Merrimack, New Hampshire, United States.

They had the following children.

  M i Russell Henry FARR-8589 was born on 9 May 1910. He died on 6 Feb 1976.
  F ii Susan FARR-8590 was born on 27 Dec 1911. She died on 10 Dec 1992.
  iii Stillborn FARR-8591.

Home First Previous Next Last

Surname List | Name Index