Ancestors of Tim Farr and Descendants of Stephen Farr Sr. of Concord, Massachusetts and Lidlington, Bedfordshire, England


Robert Frederick ALDOUS [Parents] [scrapbook]-2626 was born 1 on 17 Jul 1812 in Kelsale, Suffolk, England, United Kingdom. He was christened on 9 Aug 1812 in Kelsale, Suffolk, England, United Kingdom. He died 2 on 24 Aug 1896 in Huntsville, Weber, Utah, United States. He was buried on 27 Aug 1896 in Huntsville, Weber, Utah, United States. Robert married (MRIN:231) Mary Anne PARKIN-2627 on 24 Dec 1835 in Boston, Lincolnshire, England, United Kingdom.

THE LOG HOME BUILT BY ROBERT FREDRICK ALDOUS

Written and illustrated by Myrtle S. Hyde,
with gratitude for information from
Lester and Hazel Aldous, Adriana Aldous, Joseph Felt, Earl Felt, and Sidney Aldous
1968

On the following page is a composite drawing of the log home built by Robert Fredrick Aldous in Huntsville, Utah, in 1861, and occupied by his family in 1662, on the site where the present Lester Aldous home stands 7585 East 200 South). Traditionally, it was the first log house built in the town site of Huntsville. The east end of the house is to the right of the picture, and the rooms are in a single row.

From talking with older people, who can remember the house, it is learned that there were two lean-to porches, the one on the east entering into the “parlor,” and the one on the south opening into the kitchen.

Grandmother Mary Anne Aldous was a fussy housekeeper, and kept the parlor “special.” Joseph Felt tells that he used to help milk the cows, and sometimes went into the kitchen, but was never invited, as a farm hand, into the parlor.

On the porch by the kitchen was a trough built for the milk cans and kept full of cold water to cool the milk. The water was drawn from the well which was not far from the back door. There was another well on the other side of the house; perhaps it was dug first, while the house was still being built, and later circumstances made it convenient to have one on the south of the house, so another was dug.

The bedroom of the house was undoubtedly to the north of the kitchen­en, rather than between parlor and kitchen. When company came to stay, beds were made in the attic, or loft.

The room on the north end, beginning with the door at the left of the picture, is still being used, as a coal house, and has been moved from its original location. It was built on after the rest of the house had been completed, and was never finished, the floor being just a hole in the ground. Grandmother Aldous worried that grandchildren would open the door and fall into the hole, so she told them it was the “Boo Room,” and to stay away. The ceiling is low with the top of the doorway reaching to it. In probability all the ceilings of the house were the same, just barely clearing the head of Robert. Aldous, who was about six feet tall. His daughter-in-law, Ethel, of average height, who lived in the house for several years, said that the ceilings were so low she white-washed them while standing on the floor.

If memories are correct there were two chimneys, one for the kitchen and one for the parlor.

Possibly too many windows are drawn into the picture of the house. The window on the left is illustrated as it exists, with one side sharing its frame with the door. This was the easiest way to build a window into a log structure, and in this case, it is the only window in the room. Perhaps the other rooms had just one window each also, and if this is the case, one or two of these were very likely on the other side of the house. If the rooms had more than one window there were  probably this number on the south of the house, as drawn.

Little can be learned about the shrubs and trees on the grounds, except for the poplars that Robert Aldous planted, and an apple tree in the southeast corner of the lot.

Pioneers and Prominent Men of Utah, p.711
ALDOUS, ROBERT (son of James Aldous and Mary Ann Page of Huntingdonshire, Eng,). He was born July 17, 1811, Kelsale, Suffolk, Eng. Came to Utah Sept.
14, 1853, Claudius V. Spencer company.
Married Mary Ann Parkin Dec. 24, 1835 (daughter of Luke and Nancy Parkin). She was born Nov. 9, 1814, and came to Utah with husband. Their children: George P. b. Oct. 30, 1836, m. Christiane M. Thurston Dec. 24, 1865; Georgiana M. b. April, 1838, m. Martin Harris; Charles b. April 9, 1840, m. Lucy Drake Nov.
26, 1862; Frederick b. [p.712] Nov., 1841, m. Margaret Wilson; Angeline P. b. Dec. 27, 1843, m. Brigham Bingham Dec. 24, 1862; Henry b. 1845, died. Family home Huntsville, Utah.
Worked on some of the first public works in Salt Lake City; also on Ogden tabernacle; superintended the building of three bridges in Ogden canyon when first opened. Carpenter and builder; built first school in Huntsville and was its first superintendent; also built first log house there. Watermaster five years. Seventy; high priest.


Robert Frederick Aldous

As written by his granddaughter, Sarah Alice Aldous (Halgren), with added information as noted. Compiled by Myrtle S. Hyde, 1960.

"My grandfather, Robert Fredrick Aldous, was born 17 July 1812 in Kelsale, Suffolk, England," one of fourteen children of James Aldous and Mary Page, his father being a carpenter by trade. Robert received such an education as the common schools of his vicinity could afford, and at the age of seventeen moved with his parents to Fenstanton, Huntingdonshire, England. There he learned carpentering, and assisted his father on the estate of Rev. L. R. Brown. ("History of Utah," by Orson F. Whitney, Vol. 4, p. 433)

"At the age of twenty-four he apparently had achieved some measure of economic independence, at least sufficient to marry, and on 24 December 1835 he was wed to Mary Anne Parkin, the daughter of Luke Parkin and Ann Hancock. His wife was twenty-one years old at the time, having been born 9 November 1814."

He and his wife subsequently resided in Fenstanton, and all of their six children (George, Georgiana, Charles, Fredrick, Angelina and Henry) were born there. Henry died at the age of nine months, but the rest "were seemingly healthy and hardy"

Robert first heard the gospel preached by a Mormon Elder in front of his father's house. He was baptized into the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints on December 23, 1849. Six months later he was ordained an Elder, and soon after was appointed president of the Fenstanton Branch. The duties of that office he faithfully discharged as long as he remained in his native land. ("History of Utah," ibid.)

"He and his wife and their children sailed from Liverpool, England on the ship "James Pennell" 2 October 1850. They were members of a company of 264 saints under the direction of Elder Christopher Layton."

The following is an excerpt from the Millennial Star, describing their passage:
Robert, along with Mary Ann, George Georgiana, Charles Frederick and Agelina came to the States with the Fiftieth Company on the ship "James Pennell".

"FIFTIETH COMPANY. -- James Pennell, 254 souls.  On Wednesday October 2nd, 1850, the ship James Pennell sailed from Liverpool England, with two hundred and fifty-four Saints on board, under the direction of Christopher Layton, an American elder, who had been in England on a visit.  After an ordinary passage, the ship arrived near the mouth of the Mississippi River, and the passengers were jubilant at the prospect of soon landing on the shores of the promised land, when a terrible storm met the ship and drove her far back into the gulf, breaking her main and mizen masts, and washing part of her rigging overboard.  In this disabled condition, the emigrants, exposed to wave and wind, drifted about for several days, until the provisions on board were nearly all consumed, and starvation commenced to stare the emigrants in the face; but, finally, the crippled vessel was found by a pilot boat, and conducted to the mouth of the river, where, on the twentieth of November, she sailed up along side of the Joseph Badger, which had sailed from Liverpool with another company of Saints, over two weeks later than the James Pennell.  The two ships were now towed up together to New Orleans, where they arrived the twenty-second of November.  The next day the emigrants from the James Pennell continued the journey up the river to St. Louis, Missouri. There and in the surrounding country, they found employment for the winter, and the following year a part of them wended their way to the Valley, while others remained in St. Louis for years, before they continued the journey to Utah.  (Millennial Star, Vol. XIII, page 9.) "

"Wed. 2. [Oct. 1850] -- The ship James Pennell sailed from Liverpool, England, with 254 Saints under the direction of Christopher Layton. It arrived at New Orleans Nov. 22, 1850."

"The family lived in St. Louis for Two and one-half years. Then in the spring of 1853, they joined the Claudius V. Spencer company, which left Council Bluffs, and crossed the Missouri River on the 3rd day of June." Robert's outfit consisted of a wagon, a yoke of oxen and a cow. The only exciting incident of the journey was when the travelers met a band of five hundred Indians, whom they placated with gifts of sugar and tobacco, and were allowed to pass on unmolested. The date of arrival at Salt Lake City was September 14, 1853. after a month's stay in the city he moved to Ogden, and thence went to Bingham's Fort (the name of that place changed to Lynne, and later
incorporated into Ogden City). There he remained seven years. (History of Utah, ibid.)

"In the summer of 1861, according to available information, he, together with a group of other man (among whom was David McKay, father of President David O. Mckay) spent considerable time harvesting and putting up wild hay growing in the valley. He was also among a group of seven men who in 1861 assisted one David Jenkins (presumably a government surveyor) laying out the town site of Huntsville. In 1862 he moved his family to Huntsville, where he was a prominent citizen, and did much in a quiet unassuming way to build up community.

Because he was a skilled carpenter and builder, his services were in demand. He labored at various employments--first upon the public works at Salt Lake City, then upon the Ogden Tabernacle, and in opening Ogden Canyon, where he superintended the building of three bridges. He helped to build the first log school house in Huntsville, and superintended the building of a rock school house at the same place. The latter was constructed with a dome ceiling, and was considered a "wonderful piece of work" (John Henry Aldous wrote this in a letter to Sarah Alice Aldous Halgren, in 1955). He also assisted with his means in the erection of the meeting house and other edifices. He helped lay out the Huntsville irrigation system, as well as the mountain canal on the north side of the valley; John Henry Aldous, in the letter referred to above, says he did "it with (a) common spirit level. It must be about 13 miles long and it is as true as if it had been done with a up to date surveying instrument."

Robert Aldous was one of the first school teachers in Huntsville, and for five years was water master, serving in both positions without compensation. In the Church he held successively the offices of Elder, Seventy, and High Priest.

those who knew Robert Aldous remember him as being a tall man (over six feet) with a very short wife. He was relatively deaf, and carved an ear trumpet, asking people to talk into it to enable him to hear them. He always went to church, and took his foot long trumpet with him. Adriana Aldous (the wife of Robert's great-grandson) writes the following about Robert Aldous,

"His dry wit was much appreciated by his fellow townsmen. after the rock school house was completed, it often was cold there during the severe winter months; it was decided that they should put the stove on the opposite side of the building from where the chimney was, by the next winter, and put stove pipes along the ceiling (or close to it) so more heat would stay in the building instead of going up the chimney. Robert Aldous gave a load of barley to buy the stovepipes with. Bishop Hammond took the barley to Ogden and traded it for the stovepipes, which were installed. Upon completion, Bishop Hammond in Sacrament Meeting drew the attention of the ones present, to the beautiful new stovepipes he had gone to Ogden for and bought, giving the impression that he was the donor. The elderly Sister whom related the story to me said "Robert Aldous stood up and in his dignified way, yet with a little rougish smile on his face, said, 'Well Bishop, you did go to Ogden and bought the stovepipes, what is very commendable, but just remember, my barley (he pronounce it bearley) paid for it.',and sat down." She said it pleased the people and many a chuckle could be heard. As a rule, Robert Aldous went along not letting his right hand know what his left one did; he was kind hearted and generous."

Robert Aldous lived to the age of eighty-four years, dying in Huntsville on the 24th of August 1896.

Mary Anne PARKIN [Parents] [scrapbook] 1-2627 was born 2 on 8 Nov 1814 in Boston, Lincolnshire, England, United Kingdom. She was christened on 17 Nov 1814 in Boston, Lincolnshire, England, United Kingdom. She died 3 on 21 Apr 1892 in Huntsville, Weber, Utah, United States. She was buried on 24 Apr 1892 in Huntsville, Weber, Utah, United States. Mary married (MRIN:231) Robert Frederick ALDOUS-2626 on 24 Dec 1835 in Boston, Lincolnshire, England, United Kingdom.

Of interest in this family is the parentage of Mary Anne Parkin. Some family records state that her mother was Ann, others that she was Nancy Ann. The only documentary evidence found thus far in regard to her name is the christening records of Mary Anne and some of her brothers and sisters--in which record the mother is given as "Ann"--therefore it seems wise to use this unless or until we find something further. We are working on the Parkin genealogy, and have spent many, many hours, written numerous letters, and spent a moderate sum of money, with still very little new information coming to light. The things we have found are too involved to present here.

by Myrtle S. Hyde


Biography of Mary Anne Parkin Aldous

Written from information obtained in response to letters written to granddaughters and grandsons (see footnotes), with added information from research by Myrtle S. Hyde, Dr. Jay A. Aldous, and Mabel G. Peterson. Compiled by great-granddaughter Mabel G. Peterson 1963.

Mary Anne Parkin Aldous was born 9 Nov. 1814 in Boston, Lincolnshire, England, the fifth child and third daughter of Luke and Ann Hancock Parkin. Other children in the family are as follows: Sarah, the oldest daughter was born in 1807, a deaf mute. It is not known whether this affliction was from birth or came as a result of of an illness. She was never married. William the first son was born in 1808. He was not mentioned in his father's will (1848) so undoubtedly passed away prior to that time. Luke was born in 1810 and died in 1813.

Jesmina was born in 1811. Mary Anne called her Jesie, and was perhaps closer to her than her other sisters. (Footnote #3) Jesmina acted as a witness at Mary Anne's marriage. At this time she was twenty-four years of age, and unmarried. At the time her father's will was made, her name was recorded as Jemina and she had married James Jamison.

Eliza was born in 1816 and married Henry Simon Hurren. The youngest child, Jane , was born in 1820. She was married to Peter Pinder and was thirty-one years of age when the 1851 census was taken. After the death of her mother, Ann Hancock Parkin (1844), her father Luke Parkin and her eldest sister Sarah made their home with her. Luke Parkin was much concerned about the welfare of his eldest daughter, because of her affliction, and left specific instructions in his will that his property was to be used for her care and was not to be divided among the other heirs until after her death. (Will, 1848; and census, 1851.)

Mary Anne received $500.00 inheritance from her father's estate after she was living in Huntsville, Weber County, Utah. (Footnote #3)

Very little is known of Mary Anne's early life in schooling, but apparently she must have received the maximum education available for girls of her day.  She always used very proper precise language and retained English wording and accent (she called an apron a pinafore, etc.).  (footnote #1)

Mary Anne's father was a prosperous artisan jeweler, gunsmith, and cutler, and it was an aristocratic well to do home, provided with the luxuries of the time.  Here Mary Anne was taught to be meticulous and to care well for her belongings.  She did not learn to sew, so the family must have hired a dressmaker.  (footnote #4)

Mary Anne was married to Robert Frederick Aldous, a young carpenter, 24 Dec. 1835 when he was 24 years of age and she was 22.  Robert must have been a handsome, fine looking young man, tall, 6 feet or over, while Mary Anne was a winsome 5 feet 2. Her hair was light colored and her eyes were blue.  As far as we know she never had a picture taken. (footnote #4)

It is said that she first met Robert when he was hired to do some carpenter work for her father.  Her parents were displeased when she married a craftsman, and as they thought, beneath her station in life, when she could have married "royal blood".  (footnotes #2 and #3)

The young couple resided at Fenstanton, England and Robert was able to provide a good home for his wife and growing family.  They became parents of 6 children all born at Fenstanton.  George Parkin Aldous was born 30 Oct. 1836; Georgiana born 5 Aug. 1838; Charles born 9 Apr. 1840; Fredrick Robert born 18 Feb. 1842;Angelina Theresa born 27 Dec. 1843; Henry Parkin born 21 Jan. 1846.

Sadness came to Mary Anne when her mother passed away in 1844.  Death again saddened their home 19 Oct. 1846 when the baby, Henry Parkin Aldous, passed away at the age of 9 months.

It was about 2 years later that Robert heard the gospel preached by a young Mormon elder in front of his father's house.  He and Mary Anne became convinced of the truthfulness of the gospel and they were baptized into the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints 29 Dec. 1849.  Six months later Robert was ordained an elder and soon after was appointed as president of the branch at Fenstanton, a position he faithfully discharged as long as he remained in his native land.  (Whitney, Orson F. History of Utah, Vol. 4, p. 433)

In spite of family opposition and social pressure Mary Anne faithfully sustained her husband in all of his church responsibilities.  Robert and Mary Anne desired to obey divine command and to join with the body of the saints in Zion, so, disposing of their properties they, with their children, sailed for America from Liverpool, England on the ship "James Pennell" 2 Oct. 1850.  They were members of a company of 254 saints under the direction of Elder Christopher Layton.

The emigration of saints from foreign countries was under the direction of the first presidency of the church and was well organized for the comfort, safety, and well being of the saints, and so far as possible, certain requirements were met.

Passengers were required to board the ship either the day of their arrival in Liverpool or the day following.  Here they were placed under the supervision of a president and two counselors received by vote.  This presidency was responsible for dividing the emigrants into wards or branches, with an Elder in charge over each ward.  Watchmen were appointed and a schedule made for cleanliness, recreation, preparation and eating of meals, study, worship, and sleep.

The price of steering passage to New Orleans ranged from £3 10s. to £5 for adults, and from £3 to £4 10s.  For children aged 1 to 14.  Infants were free.  By law, provisions for 70 days were to be stocked on ships sailing between the 16th of Jan. and the 14th of Oct. on the following scale:  3 qts. water daily, 2 1/2 lb. bread or biscuit, not inferior in quality to Navy biscuit, 1 lb. wheaton flour, 5 lbs. oatmeal, 2 lb. rice, 1/2 lb. sugar, 2 oz. tea, 2 oz. salt, weakly to each adult, and 1/2 this amount to children from 1 to 14 years, except water.

In addition to the above scale, the LDS emigrants were furnished with 2 1/2 lbs. sugar, 3 lb. butter, 2 lb. cheese, and 1 pt. vinegar for each adult and 1/2 this amount for children.  This would enable many of the passengers to live more bountifully than they had been accustomed.

Those who could afford to were advised to procure more flour and sugar and such articles as potatoes, ham, dried salt fish, onions, pickled onions, preserves, cayenne pepper, baking powders, mustard, sherbet, carbonate of soda, lime juice, plums and currants. Marine soap was recommended as useful.

Emigrants were urged to bring the best tools of their trade, useful books, and if a professional man, a few of the most useful instruments and treatises pertaining to his profession. (Extracts from: Peircy, Fredrick and Linforth, James Route from Liverpool to Great Salt Lake Liverpool, F.D. Richards, 36 Islington MDCCCLV)

It was under these conditions that Robert, Mary Anne and their children traveled, and in compliance with the council given, Robert brought some of the finest carpenter tools which were very useful when he reached Deseret. Mary Anne must have had many a heartache as she left her lovely things behind and packed the bare necessities. However, womanlike, she did bring one or more silk dresses and a black bonnet trimmed with ribbons and violets, an outfit she reserved for church going and the most special occasions. (Footnote #4)

After an ordinary passage, the ship arrived near the mouth of the Mississippi River and the passengers looked forward to the prospect of landing on the shores of the Promised Land. A sudden terrible storm drove the ship back into the gulf, disabling the ship so badly that it floundered helplessly and drifted about for several days. The passengers were exposed to wind and wave and most of them became desperately sea-sick. Provisions were nearly consumed and starvation commenced to stare the emigrants in the face. At last, the crippled boat was found by a pilot boat and conducted to the mouth of the river, where it joined the "Joseph Badger" which had sailed from Liverpool two weeks later than the "James Pennel." (See the Millennial Star Vol. 13, p. 9-10.)

During the height of the storm, either from fright or despair, Mary Anne was about to be washed overboard. Her son Charles threw his arm around his mother and held on until she regained her balance. (Footnote #3)

They continued their journey up the river to St. Louis where Robert found employment to replenish their funds for the remainder of the journey. They remained here two and one half years. In the spring of 1853, they joined the Claudius V. Spencer Company, which left Council Bluffs, crossed the Missouri River on the 3rd day of June and arrived in the Salt Lake Valley Sept. 14, 1853. (History of Utah, ibid.)

The family resided in Salt Lake a short time while Robert's skill was soon put into active use working on some of the public works. They then moved to Ogden and Robert worked on the Ogden Tabernacle and superintended the building of three bridges in Ogden Canyon when it was first opened. He also built the first log house in Huntsville. (Pioneers and Prominent Men of Utah p. 712.)

Beautiful, green Ogden Valley must have reminded the Aldous' of their native land and appealed to them as the place they desired to make their permanent home. So in 1862 Robert moved his family to Huntsville, Weber County, Utah. Robert accomplished many civic , educational, and church obligations, while Mary Anne was busy keeping her home and in a quiet unassuming way became an integral part of community life. (Footnote #5)

It was a busy life for a pioneer wife and mother. Dairying was an important industry in Huntsville because of the excellent pasture. The Aldous family was engaged in this business; Mary Anne made cheese and cream was sold. The milk was placed into large six or ten gallon cans and the cans were placed in cold water to cool. There were no separators, so the cream had to be dipped from the top of the milk with a pointed-bottomed dipper. The skim milk was fed to pigs. Mary Anne wore gray calico dresses--of course with long sleeves, to do her work. She would roll the sleeves up while she was working with the milk, or other tasks for which they would be in the way, and then roll them back down. She was very economical and wasted nothing, some said, "she would skin a cat for its hide and tallow." (Footnote #4)

She was very religious and always attended church, wearing a black silk dress and the bonnet with the violets on it. Immediately, on returning home, she would take it off, a habit she had learned in England. (Footnote #4) It is said, as she and Robert walked to church, she was usually a pace or two behind him. (Footnote #2) This is very understandable when the difference in their height is considered. With his height and long legs she would have found it difficult to keep up with him without running, because of her diminutive size, and she was far too dignified to do such a thing.

She wore her hair combed straight back with a knot on the back of her neck. She was of medium build and carried herself tall and straight. She had a rather broad nose and was resembled more by her son George than by the other children. (Footnote #4)

Mary Anne enjoyed having her grandchildren come and usually tried to have some treat to give them. (Footnote #7) Another grandson remembered her as a good cook and housekeeper. (Footnote #6)

She enjoyed life to the end. The day of her passing she walked all over Huntsville (perhaps Relief Society teaching) and was just straight as an arrow. Anyone seeing her from a distance would have thought she was a young girl. (Footnote #1) After eating her dinner she suffered a stroke and passed away 21 April 1892 at the age of 78. She was buried in the Huntsville cemetery.
*************************************************************
Footnotes:  We are indebted to the following granddaughters and grandsons for answering by letter questions on the life of Mary Anne Parkin Aldous:
#1 Hannah Aldous Bihler, #2 Jean Aldous Taylor, #3 Alice Aldous Halgren, #4 Risha Aldous Ray, #5 Mabel Aldous Slater, #6 Edward Charles Aldous, #7 Henry Aldous

They had the following children.

  M i George Parkin ALDOUS-767 was born on 30 Oct 1836. He died on 13 Feb 1918.
  F ii Georgiana Maria ALDOUS-2624 was born on 5 Aug 1838. She died on 30 Oct 1858.
  M iii Charles ALDOUS-1151 was born on 9 Apr 1840. He died on 10 Aug 1924.
  M iv Frederick Robert ALDOUS-1141 was born on 22 Feb 1842. He died on 16 May 1909.
  F v Angeline Theresia ALDOUS-1605 was born on 27 Dec 1844. She died on 28 Jul 1929.
  M vi
Henry Parkin ALDOUS-208 was born on 21 Jan 1846 in Fenstanton, Huntingdonshire, England, United Kingdom. He died on 19 Oct 1846.


Richard PARK [Parents]-209 was born 1 on 21 Dec 1663 in Cambridge, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States. He died on 19 Jun 1725 in Concord, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States. Richard married (MRIN:232) Elizabeth BILLINGS-3043.

Other marriages:
KING, Sarah

He was Lieut. and a representative of Concord. His will, dated 1725, w. Elizabeth sole executrix.
Source: "History of Newton Massachusetts" by Francis Jackson Cambridge or Newton (same place)

Elizabeth BILLINGS-3043 was born in Concord, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States. Elizabeth married (MRIN:232) Richard PARK-209.

Source: "History of Newton Massachusetts" by Francis Jackson

They had the following children.

  M i
Joseph PARK-3044.

Source: "History of Newton Massachusetts" by Francis Jackson
  M ii
Josiah PARK-3045.

Source: "History of Newton Massachusetts" by Francis Jackson
  M iii
Jonathan PARK-3046.

Source: "History of Newton Massachusetts" by Francis Jackson
  M iv
Isaac PARK-3047.

Source: "History of Newton Massachusetts" by Francis Jackson
  M v
Ephraim PARK-3048.

Source: "History of Newton Massachusetts" by Francis Jackson
  F vi
Elizabeth PARK-3049.

Source: "History of Newton Massachusetts" by Francis Jackson
  F vii
Sarah PARK-3050.

Source: "History of Newton Massachusetts" by Francis Jackson
  F viii
Rebecca PARK-3051.

Source: "History of Newton Massachusetts" by Francis Jackson
  M ix
Daniel PARK-3052.

Source: "History of Newton Massachusetts" by Francis Jackson
  M x
Zacheus PARK-3053.

Source: "History of Newton Massachusetts" by Francis Jackson

Thomas PARK [Parents] 1-871 was born 2 in 1628/1629 in St Botolph, London, Middlesex, England, United Kingdom. He died 3 on 11 Aug 1690 in Newton, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States. Thomas married 4, 5 (MRIN:233) Abigail DIX-872 on 1 Dec 1653 in Cambridge, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States.

Other marriages:
, Margery

Mentioned in father's will. Crippled in King Phillip's War, 1675.

Abigail DIX [Parents]-872 was born 1 on 21 May 1637 in Watertown, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States. She died 2 on 3 Feb 1689/1690 in Newton, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States. Abigail married 3, 4 (MRIN:233) Thomas PARK-871 on 1 Dec 1653 in Cambridge, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States.


Source: "History of Newton Massachusetts" by Francis Jackson

They had the following children.

  M i Thomas PARK-873 was born on 2 Nov 1654. He died on 28 Aug 1681.
  M ii John PARK-874 was born on 6 Sep 1656. He died on 21 Mar 1718.
  F iii Abigail PARK-875 was born on 3 Mar 1658/1659. She died on 1 Mar 1745.
  M iv Edward PARK-876 was born on 8 Apr 1661. He died on 1 Mar 1745.
  M v Richard PARK-209 was born on 21 Dec 1663. He died on 19 Jun 1725.
  F vi Sarah PARK-877 was born on 21 Mar 1665/1666. She died on 19 Dec 1727.
  F vii Rebecca PARK-878 was born on 13 Apr 1668.
  M viii Jonathan PARK-879 was born on 27 Aug 1670. He died on 23 Jan 1718/1719.
  F ix Elizabeth PARK-880 was born on 28 Jul 1679.

Stephen FISKE-1755. Stephen married 1 (MRIN:234) Abigail PARK-212 on 7 Jan 1722/1723 in Reading, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States.

Abigail PARK [Parents]-212 was born 1 on 25 Jul 1693 in Newton, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States. Abigail married 2 (MRIN:234) Stephen FISKE-1755 on 7 Jan 1722/1723 in Reading, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States.


Richard PARK [Parents]-213 was born 1 on 1 Mar 1696 in Newton, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States. He died 2 on 28 Nov 1746 in Newton, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States. Richard married 3, 4 (MRIN:235) Sarah FULLER-472 on 17 Jul 1717 in Newton, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States.


Ensign Richard Park
Source: "History of Newton Massachusetts" by Francis Jackson

Sarah FULLER [Parents] 1-472 was born 2 on 5 Oct 1695 in Newton, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States. She died 3 on 20 Mar 1737 in Newton, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States. She was buried in Mar 1737. Sarah married 4, 5 (MRIN:235) Richard PARK-213 on 17 Jul 1717 in Newton, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States.


Source: "History of Newton Massachusetts" by Francis Jackson
Mentioned in father's will

They had the following children.

  M i William PARK-473 was born on 16 Feb 1718.
  M ii Thomas PARK-474 was born on 15 Nov 1719.
  F iii Jerusha PARK-417 was born on 22 Nov 1722. She died on 26 Apr 1756.
  F iv
Hannah PARK-3694 was born 1 on 22 Nov 1722 in Newton, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States.
  F v Huldah PARK-475 was born on 18 Dec 1724.
  F vi Priscilla PARK-476 was born on 5 Apr 1726.
  F vii
Abigail PARK-477 was born 1 on 28 Jun 1728 in Newton, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States.
  M viii Amariah PARK-478 was born in 1733. He died on 17 Jul 1761.

Joseph MERRIAM [Parents] [scrapbook] 1-215 was born in 1600 in Tudeley, Kent, England, United Kingdom. He was christened in of Hadlow, Kent, England, United Kingdom. He died 2, 3 on 1 Jan 1640/1641 in Concord, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States. Joseph married 4, 5 (MRIN:236) Sarah GOLDSTONE-216 in BY 1624 in Tudeley, Kent, England, United Kingdom.

Joseph had a will 6 on 29 Oct 1640 in Concord, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States.

JOSEPH MIRIAM.
From London to Charlestown Mass. in 1638

The 29th the 10th month in the yeare of our Lord 1640.

The last will & Testament of Joseph miriam of Concord.
I Joseph Miriam of Concord being weake hi bodie, but blessed be God of good memory and sense inwardly do comit my soule to God in Jesus Christ & my body to the earth from whence it came.
Item. To wife Sarah all my whole estate towards & for the bring vp of al my children. Power to her to sell my house I now live in, it beinge larger and bigger than she shall stand in need of. The overplus of providing a lease house shal be disposed in some way for the good and benefit of my wife & children. Wife to bring up all the children till they are one & twenty the sonnes: & the daaghters either at that time or at the day of marriage. When my oldest child shall be one & twenty, the estate to be prised & wife Sarah to hare one third. If she marries to have one third.
Wife whole executor & wth her my welbeloved brethren Mr. Thomas ffiint Simon Willard Robert Miriam put in trust.
Testified vpon oath to be the last will of Joseph Miriam 26: 8. 1642, by George ffowle.
Capt cop nobis
die et anno superadicto
Rich: Bellingham
Increase Nowell

The Merriam (Joseph, George and Robert) and Flint families are mentioned in
                       one of Ralph Waldo Emerson's poems "Hamatreya:"

                       "Bulkeley, Hunt, Willard, Hosmer, Meriam, Flint,
                       Possessed the land which rendered to their toil
                       Hay, corn, roots, hemp, flax, apples, wool and wood.

                       Where are these men? Asleep beneath their grounds
                       And strangers, fond as they, their furrows plough.
                       They added ridge to valley, brook to pond
                       And sighed for all that bounded their domain.

                       Each of these landlords walked amidst his farm
                       Saying 'T' is mine, my children's and my name's"

The poem was cited in a book on Concord by Ruth Wheeler, "Concord, Climate for Freedom."

Peter Bulkeley was the Reverend and one of twelve families to which Concord was granted. There is no record of the other incorporators, but it is concluded that the Merriams and Flints were likely among them.


The following is from "Meriam's Corner" on the internet at www.meriam.org

                                          Meriam's Corner, Minute Man National
                                                         Historical Park


                              For the past few years, members of the Merriam family have
                        been meeting each spring at Minute Man National Historical Park
                        in Concord, Massachusetts, to plan a campaign to restore the
                        historic house at Meriam's Corner This house is one of the oldest
                        surviving structures built by the family after it immigrated to
                        America, and dates at least to 1705. In 2005 it will be 300 years old.
                        On April 18, 1775. Meriam's Corner was the scene of the first heavy
                        fighting of the Battle of Lexington and Concord In recognition of
                        its role in American history, the National Park Service purchased
                        Meriam's Corner to be part of Minute Man National Historic Park
                        and the western anchor of the Battle Road Trail, a new 5-mile
                        interpretive hiker biker trail.

                              The house is structurally sound, but the exterior finish and the
                        interior are deteriorated and badly in need of repair. The family
                        hopes to raise $300-500,000 to restore it, and to establish an
                        endowment for continuous maintenance of the house. We are
                        officially launching a 5-year fundraising campaign this year, the
                        225th anniversary of the Battle, and hope to reach our goal by the
                        300th anniversary of the house in 2005. A fund has been
                        established with the National Park Foundation, 1101 17th St. NW,
                        Suite 1102, Washington, D.C. 20036, so that donations can be
                        tax-deductible. NPF exists primarily to oversee, private donations
                        for projects in National Pinks and has extensive experience in fund
                        management. Important!! Make sure you mention "Merriam's
                        Corner Fund" when you send any donations.

                              This will be a public-private partnership. Minute Man Park has
                        successfully competed for $1.6 million, a share of the Exxon Valdez
                        settlement, to rehabilitate the exterior of Meriam's Corner and other
                        historic houses in the Park. This work is underway, and will
                        complement ours.

                              Every April, the community holds a Meriam's Corner
                        Observance with marchers in Revolutionary costumes, as part of
                        Concord's and the Park's observance of the battles and of Patriot's
                        Day.

Sarah GOLDSTONE [Parents]-216 was born in 1602 in Tudeley, Kent, England, United Kingdom. She died on 12 Mar 1670/1671 in Concord, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States. She was buried in Mar 1670/1671 in Concord, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States. Sarah married 1, 2 (MRIN:236) Joseph MERRIAM-215 in BY 1624 in Tudeley, Kent, England, United Kingdom.

Other marriages:
WHEELER, Joseph Lt.

They had the following children.

  F i Mary MERRIAM-220 was born in 1625. She died on 10 Dec 1699.
  M ii William MERRIAM-223 was born about 1628. He died on 22 May 1689.
  M iii
Thomas MERRIAM-226 was born about 1630 in Concord, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States.

Living in 1637
  M iv Joseph MERRIAM-219 was born in 1630. He died on 20 Apr 1677.
  F v Elizabeth MERRIAM-221 was born in 1632. She died on 17 Oct 1704.
  F vi Hannah MERRIAM-229 was born about 1633.
  M vii John MERRIAM-225 was born on 9 Jul 1641. He died on 27 Feb 1725.

William MERRIAM [scrapbook] 1-1581 was born on 11 May 1564 in Tudeley, Kent, England, United Kingdom. He was christened on 11 May 1564 in England, United Kingdom. He died 2 on 27 Nov 1635 in Hadlow, Kent, England, United Kingdom. William married (MRIN:237) Sarah BURGES-1582 in England, United Kingdom.

WILLIAM Mirriam of Hadlowe, Kent, clothier, 8 September 1635, proved 27 November 1 1635. To the poor of Hadlowe ten shillings. To my daughter Susan, already preferred, fifty shillings. The like sum to daughter Margaret, likewise preferred. To daughter Joane, already preferred, one shilling. To my daughter Sara forty pounds within three months next after my decease. To wife Sara all the household stuff of mine which is in my now dwelling house situate at Barnestreet in Hadlowe and the five pounds per annum which is to be paid out of my lands in Goodherst, Kent, during her natural life. I give her also three pounds per annum to be paid to her during her natural life out of my tenementi and lands in Yalding, Kent. And she shall have her dwelling and abiding in my dwelling house aforesaid after my decease during the whole term of her natural life, with free access, ingress, egress and recourse to and from the same and into and from the gardens and orchards for herbs, water and for her brewing, baking, washing, drying and the like needful occasions. To my son Joseph Myrriam all such household stull as I shall have at the time of my decease remaining and being in the house wherein he now dwelleth situate in Tewdly, or elsewhere where he shall then dwell, being in his custody or possession. To George Mirriam my son five pounds and to his daughter Mary, my god daughter, five shillings. To William Howe, my grandchild, ten shillings and to every child of his father Thomas Howe which be had by my daughter, his late deceased wife, I will five shillings. To William Mirriam my grandchild, son of the said Joseph my son, five shillings. And touching my lands and tenements I will to Joseph Mirriam my son &c. all my lands and tenements in Yalding charged with the before mentioned annuity of three pounds. To Robert my son the messuage wherein I now dwell, in Hadlowe with the barns, outhhouses, yards, gardens, orchardj and all my lands thereto belonging, and all other my lands, tenements &c. in Hadlowe. And I give him all my goods and chattels not formerly bequeathed. And I make him sole executor.
Proved by Christopher Crispe, Notary Public, attorney for Robert Mirriam, son and executor.
Rochester Wills, Vol. xxii. (1631-1644), vol. 165.

Printed from NEHG Register, Volume 50, October 1896,  New England Historic Genealogical Society & Broderbund Software, Inc., Banner Blue Division, February 20, 2001
1896.]

Sarah BURGES-1582 was born in 1559 in Goudhurst, Kent, England, United Kingdom. She died in Hadlow, Kent, England, United Kingdom. Sarah married (MRIN:237) William MERRIAM-1581 in England, United Kingdom.

They had the following children.

  M i
William MERRIAM-1583 was born on 16 Jul 1581 in Goudhurst, Kent, England, United Kingdom.
  F ii Joane MERRIAM-1584 was born in 1583.
  F iii
Margaret MERRIAM-1585 was born in 1585 in Hadlow, Kent, England, United Kingdom.
  F iv Susan MERRIAM-1586 was born in 1587. She died in 1684.
  F v Sarah MERRIAM-1587 was born about 1589. She died on 8 Sep 1635.
  F vi Miss MERRIAM-1588 was born about 1589.
  M vii Joseph MERRIAM-215 was born in 1600. He died on 1 Jan 1640/1641.
  M viii George MERRIAM-1589 was born in 1602. He died on 29 Dec 1675.
  M ix Robert MERRIAM-1590 was born in 1603. He died on 15 Feb 1681/1682.

Joseph WHEELER Lt. 1, 2-1756 was christened 3 on 18 Feb 1609 in Cranfield, Bedfordshire, England, United Kingdom. He died 4 about 1681 in Concord, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States. Joseph married 5 (MRIN:238) Sarah GOLDSTONE-216 after 1642 in Concord, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States.

Other marriages:
, Elizabeth

Was a Lieutenant

Sarah GOLDSTONE [Parents]-216 was born in 1602 in Tudeley, Kent, England, United Kingdom. She died on 12 Mar 1670/1671 in Concord, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States. She was buried in Mar 1670/1671 in Concord, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States. Sarah married 1 (MRIN:238) Joseph WHEELER Lt.-1756 after 1642 in Concord, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States.

Other marriages:
MERRIAM, Joseph


John GOLDSTONE 1-1067 was born in 1574 in Tonbridge, Kent, England, United Kingdom. He died on 12 Mar 1671 in Concord, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States. John married (MRIN:239) Frances JEFFRIE-1068.

Frances JEFFRIE [Parents] 1-1068 was born about 1572 in Pemburie, Kent, England, United Kingdom. Frances married (MRIN:239) John GOLDSTONE-1067.

Mentioned in her mother's will.

They had the following children.

  M i
Robert GOLDSTONE-1073 was born about 1600 in of Tonbridge, Kent, England, United Kingdom. He died on 16 May 1657.

DEATH: Will Probate
  M ii
Roger GOLDSTONE-1074 was born about 1602 in of Tonbridge, Kent, England, United Kingdom.
  F iii Sarah GOLDSTONE-216 was born in 1602. She died on 12 Mar 1670/1671.
  F iv Jane GOLDSTONE-1075 was born about 1604.
  F v Elizabeth GOLDSTONE-1076 was born about 1604. She died before 16 May 1637.
  F vi Frances GOLDSTONE-1079 was born about 1608.

Thomas HORTON-800 was born 1 about 1555 in Coole, Cheshire, England, United Kingdom. He died 2 about 1620 in St Martin in the Vintry, Coole, Cheshire, England, United Kingdom. Thomas married 3 (MRIN:240) Catherine SATCHFIELD-217 about 1595 in Coole, Cheshire, England, United Kingdom.

Other marriages:
CULVERWELL, Margaret

Will of Thomas Horton

In his will, dated 6 March 1615 and proved 17 January 1620/1 (FCC, 4 Dale), "Thomas Horton of the parishe of St. Martin in the Vyntrey, Citizen and Mercer of London," according to "the lawdable custome of the Cittey of London," divided his estate into three equal parts, one for wife, one for children, and one for other legacies:

[the first part] to Catherine Horton my wellbeloved wife ... The second or full third parte of all my said goodes chattells plate and househould stuffe (in regard I have not as yet given any parte or porcion of my goodes [and] chattles unto John Horton, Sara Horton, and Parnall Horton the children of me the said Thomas Horton or in anye other sort advanced them) ... equallye amongst them ... And the last or other third parte ... to the poor of the parish of St. Martin in the Vintry, where I now dwell, five pounds ... unto my brother William Horton ... one annuitye ... of eight pounds ... to my sister Margaret Williamson ... one annuitie ... of 40s. ... unto my daughter Margaret Culverwell the wife of Richard Culverwell ten pounds per annum during their lifetimes and if Richard Culverwell should die first, then the annuity to be increased to twentie pounds per annum .... To aforesaid daughters Sara and Parnell Horton fifty pounds apiece ... on the daies of their ... marriages ... upon condition that [if] either of them marry without the consent and good likeinge of Catherine my nowe wife, their unckle Mr Richard Satchfelld, and my executor hereafter named ... [she] shall forfeite and lose the foresaide [legacy] .... unto Thomas Horton the sonne of Lawrence Horton, forty pounds [at age 21] unto St. Bartholomew's Hospital near West Smithfield, London, five pounds to the poor children harbored in Christ's Hospital, five pounds. ... unto my sonne Thomas Horton (whome I have alreadie verye bountefullie and loveinglye advaunced) 26s. 8d. in full satisfaction of his parte and portion. ...to my lovinge friends Mr. William Spurstowe and his wife, Mr. George Ricketts and his wife, my cosen Edward Addams and his wife, my cousin Nicholas Plommer and his wife, Mr. Reignold Hughes and his wife, and Mr. William Bond, to everie one of them a ringe of gould of the value of 26s. 8d. ... to John Horton unto whome I was a witness [i.e., godfather] a ring of gould of 26s. 8d. price ... [the same] unto William Spurstowe unto whome I was a witness [and] unto my daughter-in-law Mary Horton ... to her sonne Thomas Horton unto whom I was a witness [the same] ... And whereas there was latelie conveyed by Anthony Culverwell whilst he lived Citizen and Mercer of London deceased unto ... John Horton my sonne five messuages or tenements in the parish of St. James at Garlickhithe London and one tenement with a garden in Bell Alley Coleman Streete, London ... And for the ... better strengthninge of the estates of the said John Horton ... I doe give and bequeathe all (my right in these lands) unto the said John Horton my sonne .... The rest and residue unto my sonne John Horton and I doe make [him] sole executor ... and appointe my lovinge friendes Mr. William Bond marchaunt taylor and Mr.William Spurstowe mercer to be overseers.... Witnesses: Will[ia]m Bond, Ant[hony] Bond, and Richard Rochdale Scr[ivener].

Printed from NEHG Register, Volume 147, July 1993, © New England Historic Genealogical Society & Brøderbund Software, Inc., Banner Blue Division, February 23, 2001


"Chronological History of Massachusetts", Flying the Colors: Massachusetts Facts: John Clements, 1987; Tolland and Windham Counties, Connecticut biographies - 1903; Mayflower Gedcom; LDS Ancestral File; Research of John F. Chandler and Betty I. Ralph.

Catherine SATCHFIELD [Parents] 1-217 was christened 2 on 27 May 1569 in St Peters Cornhill, London, Middlesex, England, United Kingdom. She was buried 3 on 13 Sep 1627 in St Margaret Moses, Friday Street, , England, United Kingdom. Catherine married 4 (MRIN:240) Thomas HORTON-800 about 1595 in Coole, Cheshire, England, United Kingdom.

Will of Katherine Horton

In the name of God amen, this ninth day of September Anno Dni 1627 I Katherine Horton being sicke in body but of good and perfect memorie thankes bee given to God doe publish and declare this my last will and testament in manner and forme foHowing, viz: first and principally I give and bequeathe my soule unto the hands of Allmightie God my Creator and Redeemer hopeing & faithfully beleeveing to bee saved only by the merritts & glorious deathe of our Lord and Saviour Jesus Christe & my body to the ground from whence it was taken to bee buried att convenient time in the daytime. And as for such worldly goods as it hath pleased God to blesse me with I give and bequeathe in manner and I orme following that is to say ]mprimis I give and bequeath to my loveing daughter Parnell Wallis wife of James Wal]is one hundred pounds. Item I give and bequeath to my loveing daughter Sara Conant the some of fiftie poundes. Item I give and bequeathe to my loveing grandchilde Elizabeth Wallis the some of twentie poundes. Item I give and bequeathe to my loveing grandchilde Caleb Connant the some of thirtie poundes. Item I give and bequeathe unto my lovemg grandchilde Sara Connant the same of twenlie poundes of lawful money of England. I give and bequeath to my godson [blank] Kendall sonne of Cosen Kendall the some of twentie shillings. The rest and residue of of my chattelles goods debts household stuffe and estate whatsoever my debts being truly first payd and dischardged and my funerall chardges also being deducted I give and bequeath to my loveing sister Mary Stonehowse the some of twentie shillings. Item I give and bequeath to my loveing Cosen Katherine Kidder wife to John Kidder the some of twenlie shillings of lawful money of England. Item I give and bequeath to my loveing goddaughter Katherine Clarke the some of twentie shillings of lawfull money of England. Now I say the rest of my estate whatsoever my will as is foresaid being fully performed I give and bequeath to my loveing daughter Parnell Wallis my sole and absolute executrix of this my last will and testament and I doe here frustrate and nullifie all former wills by mee made whatsoever and in wittness of this my last will and testament! have hereunto set my hand and seale dated the day and yeare above written the marke of Katherine Horton sealed signed and delivered in the presence of us Sarah Jones EIiz: May & John (Monger?); proved 13 October 1627 by Parnell Waflis.

Printed from NEHG Register, Volume 147, July 1993, © New England Historic Genealogical Society & Brøderbund Software, Inc., Banner Blue Division, February 23, 2001

They had the following children.

  F i Sarah HORTON-1138 was born on 19 Sep 1595. She died before 1677.
  F ii Parnell HORTON-3598 was born about 1600.

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