Ancestors of Tim Farr and The Descendants of Stephen Farr


Daniel POWERS [Parents] 1 was born 2 on 10 May 1669 in Concord, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States. Daniel married Martha BATES in 1711.

Other marriages:
WHITCOMB, Elizabeth

Martha BATES. Martha married Daniel POWERS 1 in 1711.


Increase POWERS [Parents] 1 was born 2 on 16 Jul 1671 in Concord, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States. Increase married Hepzebeth SAWYER.

Hepzebeth SAWYER. Hepzebeth married Increase POWERS 1.


Walter POWERS Jr [Parents] 1 was born 2 on 28 Jun 1674 in Concord, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States. He died in 1738. Walter married 3 Rebecca BARNETT Barrett on 16 Dec 1696 in Chelmsford, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States.

Source: "The Shepard Families OF New England" Vol I FHL 929.273 Sh 47j

Rebecca BARNETT Barrett. Rebecca married 1 Walter POWERS Jr 2 on 16 Dec 1696 in Chelmsford, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States.


Jacob POWERS [Parents] 1 was born 2 on 15 Dec 1679 in Concord, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States. He died 3 about 1768. Jacob married Edith ADAMS.

Other marriages:
MERRIAM, Sara

Edith ADAMS. Edith married Jacob POWERS 1.


Jacob POWERS [Parents] 1 was born 2 on 15 Dec 1679 in Concord, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States. He died 3 about 1768. Jacob married 4 Sara MERRIAM on 18 Sep 1703.

Other marriages:
ADAMS, Edith

Sara MERRIAM. Sara married 1 Jacob POWERS 2 on 18 Sep 1703.


Moses BARROW Barron. Moses married 1 Sarah POWERS on 8 Apr 1702.

Sarah POWERS [Parents] was born 1, 2 on 8 Feb 1683 in Concord, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States. She died in 1743. Sarah married 3 Moses BARROW Barron on 8 Apr 1702.


Thomas KING [Parents] 1, 2, 3, 4 was born on 24 Feb 1613 in Cold Norton, Essex, England, United Kingdom. He was christened on 24 Feb 1613 in Cold Norton, Essex, England, United Kingdom. He died on 24 Sep 1691 in Scituate, Plymouth, Massachusetts, United States. Thomas married 5 Sarah PIKE in 1637 in Scituate, Plymouth, Massachusetts, United States.

Thomas had a will 6 on 30 Jun 1691 in Scituate, Plymouth, Massachusetts, United States.

Other marriages:
YOUNG, Jane
, Anne

[WILL OF THOMAS KING, SR.]

[1: 120] On 30 June, 1691, "Thomas King Senr" .... of Scituate" made his will. Bequests were as follows:

To "wife Anne King the East End of my dwelling house Called the Parlour to dwell in and the Chamber over it with a liberty to make Some use of the Cellers and and leantoos .... during her life time Alsoe two Cowes One Bed and Bedding thereto belonging One Trunk and one Box and the one third of all my moveable Goods which are in the house or household Stuff in Such of Sd Goods as may be most Sutable for her use And Said two Cows and Said Goods sloe is to have them for her own to dispose of as she pleases And .... my said wife Shall have five pounds by the year paid to her the one half of it in money the other half of it in Come and other Provision also wood provided for her fire and winter meat and Sumer meat for two Cows by my Executor .... during the life of my said Wife"

To "my Daughter Sarah Besbey the use and Improvement of three acres of my marsh land up the River in Marshfield next to the Gravelly Beach there and So by the upland side during her naturall life and the life of her husband" also £30 "fifteen pounds of said thirty to be paid to her Out of my moveable Estate within one month after this my Will is Proved .... And the other fifteen pounds .... within two years after my decease the one half of it in money the other half of it in Good Currant merchantable Countrey pay"

To "my Grandson John Rogers" No, "five pounds of 5d Sum to be paid .... out of my moveable Estate within one month after this my Will is Proved the other five pounds to be paid the one half in money the other half in Good merchantable Countrey pay within two years after my decease

To "my Grandson Thomas Rogers" No, with the same provisions as governed the bequest to the grandson John Rogers.

"Robben my Negro Servant [p. 121] Shall be set free .... and I do Give unto said Roben ye Negro the Bed whereon he Comonly useth to lodge in with the Beding thereunto belonging and also .... five pounds .... in Good Currant pay .... fifty shillings of it within one year after my decease & fifty shillings of it within two years after my decease"

"all the Rest of my Estate .... both in New England and in old England I do Give .... unto my Son Thomas King whome I do hereby Constitute .... the sole Executor"

The witnesses were John Cushing, John Cushing, Jr., and Joshua Cushing. "John Cushing Esq" and John Cushing, Jr., made oath to the will of "mr Thomas King", at Plymouth, 16 March 1691/2.

"The County Court .... do hereby Impower John Cushing Esqr Assistant to give ye other witness ~ Joshua Cushing his oath to ye within written will And to Give ye within named Executor his oath to yC Inventory of ye Estate of ye within said Mr Thomas King deceased"

Joshua Cushing, the third witness, made oath to the will on 26 March, 1692.

[p. 122] An inventory was taken, 3 November, Nor, by William Holbrooke (signed by mark) and John Cushing, Sr. No real estate was mentioned. Thomas King, Jr., the executor, made oath to it 26 March, 1692.
Printed from Mayflower Descendant Legacy CDROM, Search & Research Pub. Co.

A Controversy Over the Mode of Baptism:

("Scituate and Barnstable Church Records," Register, 10 [1856]: 42). Thomas King, William Vassall, and Gilbert and William Brooks were also Blessing passengers who settled in Scituate.

John Stockbridge probably did not come to New England for religious freedom, but more likely for better economic conditions. There is no indication of his membership in the church, only the name of his wife Ann appearing in the records. "Goodwife Stockbridge" joined the church in Scituate on 16 July 1637 (ibid., 9 [1855]: 280), and soon was active in the controversy which split the church a few years later. The first minister, the Reverend John Lothrop, had a congregation unsettled over the mode of baptism, and in 1639 he and about half of the members left for Barnstable. Ann Stockbridge was among those who remained, under the leadership of Timothy Hatherly. The following year Charles Chauncey of Plymouth was called as the new pastor. Ann, with William Vassall and his daughter Judith, Elder King and his wife Sarah, Thomas Lapham, and John Twisden refused to join the call for Mr. Chauncey, as outlined in their "Renewal of Covenant by the Church of Christ in Scituate, distinct from that of which Mr Chauncy is Pastor," dated 2 February 1642/3 (Deane, Hist. of Scituate, 59-61).

Further evidence of the baptism controversy in the Scituate church is found in the Stockbridge family, for although their daughter Hannah was baptized by Mr. Lothrop in 1637, daughter Elizabeth was taken to Boston for baptism in 1642, "to avoid her being immersed, as Mr. Chauncey insisted must be done" (Charles Henry Pope, The Pioneers of Massachusetts [Boston, 1900], 435). Four years later, when the first child of John Stockbridge by his second wife was baptized, it was done by the Reverend William Witherell, who had been ordained as minister of the second church at Scituate on 2 September 1645 (Deane, Hist. of Scituate, 191; Pope, Pioneers of Mass., 435). Evidently, then, John Stockbridge, although apparently not a member of this church, accepted their doctrines, as did his second wife.


Printed from NEHG Register, Volume 133, April 1979, New England Historic Genealogical Society & Brederbund Software, Inc., Banner Blue Division, February 22, 2001

Mentioned in his father's will

Sarah PIKE was born in 1617 in Scituate, Plymouth, Massachusetts, United States. She died 1 on 16 Jun 1652 in Scituate, Plymouth, Massachusetts, United States. Sarah married 2 Thomas KING 3, 4, 5, 6 in 1637 in Scituate, Plymouth, Massachusetts, United States.

PLYMOUTH COLONY VITAL RECORDS
[p. 24] Deathes: Sarah King the wife of Thomas Kinge Deceased June the sixt 1652 Surname may be Brown

They had the following children.

  F i Rhoda KING was born on 11 Oct 1639. She died in 1662.
  M ii
George KING 1 was born 2 on 24 Dec 1642 in Scituate, Plymouth, Massachusetts, United States.
  M iii
Daniel KING was born 1 on 4 Feb 1647 in Scituate, Plymouth, Massachusetts, United States.

Daniel was baptized 2, 3 on 13 Feb 1647 in Scituate, Plymouth, Massachusetts, United States.
  M iv Thomas KING was born on 21 Sep 1645. He died on 1 Dec 1711.
  F v Sarah KING was born on 26 May 1650.
  M vi
John KING 1 was born 2 on 27 Jun 1652 in Scituate, Plymouth, Massachusetts, United States. He died on 26 Jul 1652 in Massachusetts, United States.

Deacon Thomas CLAPP [Parents] [scrapbook] 1, 2 was born 3 in 1609 in Sidbury, Devonshire, England, United Kingdom. He died 4, 5 on 20 Apr 1684 in Scituate, Plymouth, Massachusetts, United States. Thomas married 6, 7 Jane about 1637 in Scituate, Plymouth, Massachusetts, United States.

Other marriages:
WRIGHT, Abigail

3. THOMAS2 CLAPP (Nicholas,2 Widow Christian1) was presumably born in Sidbury, co. Devon, about 1609. In 1678 he testified that his age was "about 69 yeares." In 1630 his kinsman Roger Clapp of the neighboring parish of Salcombe Regis, co. Devon, went to New England, the forerunner of a large group of family emigrants. About the first of May in 1633 a ship left the port of Weymouth for the voyage to America. Governor Winthrop recorded that she arrived at Boston on July 24, "with about 80 passengers and 12 kine, who sate down at Dorchester. They were 12 weeks coming, being forced into
Dean and Chapter of Exeter.

† The Clapp Memorial, by Ebenezer Clapp. Boston. 1876, contains a vast amount of genealogical and biographical material about the Clapp emigrants and their descendants. It must be used with discrimination, however. All genealogies contain errors of fact and of judgment, but quite naturally this is particularly the case with publications of an early date.

90   The Ancestry of Joseph Neal

the Western Islands by a leak, where they stayed three weeks and were very courteously used by the Portugals." Weymouth was the convenient port for east Devon and it is reasonably supposd that among the voyagers who enjoyed an unexpected stay in the Azores were Thomas Clapp, his brother Nicholas, and his sisters Barbara; Redigon and Prudence, the latter the wife of their kinsman Edward Clapp, all of whom were soon afterward in Dorchester, where Roger Clapp had settled. Their younger brother John followed them a few years later.

Thomas Clapp's name appears on the Dorchester records in 1634, and in 1638 he was a freeman of the town. By 1639 he had moved on to Weymouth but his stay there was a short one. Wcymouth was in the throes of theological controversy. The local parson, Mr. Lenthal, believed that all baptized persons should be admitted to the church without further trial. For this liberal heresy he was called to account by government and retracted, but one of his chief adherents, Richard Silvester, was steadfast and, on being disenfranchised, moved to Scituate in the more tolerant colony of Plymouth. Thomas Clapp was one of a group of Weymouth men, including Thomas Rawlins, James Torrey and William Holbrook, who left Weymouth for Scituate at about the same time, and possibly for similar reasons.

In Scituate Clapp was propounded freeman on June 6, 1644, and admitted , June 4, 1645, and the latter year he served as constable. He purchased a farm of twenty-four acres from Mr. Timothy Hatherly in 1645. Uniting with the first church he became its deacon in 1647 and remained loyal to Rev. Charles Chauncey, his pastor and the future president of Harvard College, when a large portion of the congregation abandoned him to form a second parish where infant baptism, disapproved of by Mr. Chauncey, could be practiced. Happily Clapp lived to be a member of the committee of reconcilement which reunited the parishes in 1675 in a somewhat less controversial age. He was Scituate's deputy to the Plymouth General Court in 1649, and the town s overseer of the poor, the first appointed, in 1667.

It is probable that Thomas Clapp was married three times, the names of the first two wives being unknown. His third wife was Abigail (Wright), widow of Robert Sharp of Muddy River. Sharp died in 1655. After Clapp s death she married Capt. William Holbrook of Scituate. When Clapp's son Eleazer died in 1676 the papers dealing with the probate of his estate indicate

Clapp, of Scituate 91

that his only heirs by intestacy were his brothers Thomas and -Samuel. As. brothers and sisters of the half-blood did.. not in- -bent under the common law we can therefore say with certainty that Thomas, Samuel and Eleazer Clapp were sons of one moth-~ er, their father's first wife. The two children of- the third wife, Abigail, are duly recorded in the vital records of Scituate. This leaves three children, Increase, Prudence and Elizabeth, all mentioned in their father's will, who are with strong probability to be assigned to an unknown second wife.

Deacon Clapp died in Scituate April 20, 1684. His will, made the day before his death, was proved June 4, 1684. He states that he is "in ye 87 yeer of my age," but this is an exaggeration or an error of ten years. To his wife Abigail he left the use and profits of all his houses and lands and his orchard for life, with strict injunction against waste, also £10 in silver in the hands of his son Samuel Clapp, also two feather beds and their furnishings, the best brass kettle, a skillet, an iron kettle, an iron pot, two pewter basins, four pewter platters, six napkins, a table-cloth, twelve trenchers, a long chest, two boxes and as many other small things as she desired up to the value of 30s. She was to have three cows, six sheep and a horse, which after her decease were to be divided among her children. To his son Thomas Clapp, all his apparell, both linen and woolen, his shoes, stockings and hats, and a double portion of the lands after Abigail Clapp s death. To his son Samuel Clapp, two committee lots and a single portion of the lands. To his son Increase Clapp, two young cattle and a single portion of the lands. To his daughter Elizabeth King, £7, the best brass pan, a bed and its furniture and a single portion of the lands. To his daughter Prudence Clapp, two cows, the second brass pan, a feather bed and its furniture, £7 in movables and a single portion of the lands, and she to have her residence in his house until his wife s death. To his daughter Abigail Clapp, £5, two cows and a single portion of the lands. To his daughter Mary Tilden,* three sheep and two lambs. To his grandchild Elizabeth, a sheep and a lamb. Executors: sons Thomas Clapp and Samuel Clapp. Appraisers appointed in the will: friends John Briggs, Nathaniel Tilden, John Buck, Sr. Witnesses: John Wetherehl, Israel Turner. The inventory contained property valued at £351.t

* This was Mary (Sharp), wife of Nathaniel Tilden and daughter of Abigail (Wright) (Sharp) Clapp by her former marriage.
† Plymouth County Probate, 4(2): 129, 133, 134.

Thomas Clapp, immigrant, born in Dorchester, England, 1597 was son of Richard Clap of Dorchester, and brother of Nicholas Clapp, an immigrant settler of Dorchester, Massachusetts Bay Colony, known to genealogists as"Nicholas of Dorchester." These two brothers were cousins of Edward and Roger Clapp, sons of William Clap, the younger, of Salcombe-Regis, Devonshire, England, and this gives us Richard Clap of Dorchester England, and William Clap, the elder of Salcombe, England, as brothers.  The name is probably of Norse origin, if we take it to be derived from Clapa, as Osgood Clapa, a famous Danish nobleman, was a prime favorite of Hardacanute, an early English king; or it may be a cognate form of some ancient gothic word, as we find the German name Klapp of frequent occurrence. ----

Thomas Clapp, the immigrant, arrived in Boston, July 24, 1633, probably on the ship which arrived from Weymouth, England, that date. He was probably accompanied by his brother Nicholas and cousin Edward. Another brother, John, arrived much later.  Thomas removed to Dorchester in 1634, and became a freeman of the town and of the colony 1638, and the same year removed to Weymouth, a town of recent establishment, having been set apart by the general court out of the plantation of Wessaguscas, September 2, 1635.  He appears to have tarried in the new town but a short time, ---He appears in the town of Scituate, as a deacon in the First Church, 1647, and as deputy in the general court 1649, and when the town meeting petitioned the general court for an officer to take care of the poor of the town he was made overseer in 1667--the first record we have of an "overseer of the poor" as a town officer in Scituate.  He had grants of land in Hingham, but may not have resided there.  He went to Weymouth and thence to Scituate.  He appears to have been Scituate as early as 1640.  As deacon of the First Church, over which Rev.  Charles Chauncey was minister (1641-53, he was a witness of the difficulties that beset the pastor and parishioners of the church that led to its division at the establishment of the Second Church.  Previous to his leaving Massachusetts Bay Colony he appears to have been a disciple of Richard Sylvester and of Mr. Lenthail, the minister who advocated the admitting of any baptized person to membership in the church without further examination, and Thomas Rawlins, James Torrey and William Holbrook went: with Richard Sylvester to Plymouth Colony, settling in Scituate about the same time Thomas Clapp removed to that town, and it is probable the question of baptism moved all these men to seek freedom in the Pilgrim Colony. (It appears that there was a 30 year controversy between the First and Second Churches in Scituate) and in 1675, Thomas was selected one of three members of a committee from the First Church appointed in 1673 to carry a letter containing news of reconciliation to the Second Church, so long desired by the peaceloving of both congregations.  His sister Prudence married her cousin Edward Clapp.  The family name of his wife Abigail is not known.  He died in Scituate, April 20, 1684, greatly respected, a useful and enterprising man blessed with a good wife, eight children and length of days, having attained the ninety-seventh year of his age. The children of Thomas and Abigail Clapp were: Thomas, born in Weymouth, March 15, 1639; Increase, Samuel, Eleazer, Elizabeth, Prudence, John and Aigail, all born in Scituate.  Elizabeth, our grandmother, married Thomas King (Jr).

Jane was born 1 about 1617. She died 2 before Jan 1656/1657 in of Scituate, Plymouth, Massachusetts, United States. Jane married 3, 4 Deacon Thomas CLAPP 5, 6 about 1637 in Scituate, Plymouth, Massachusetts, United States.

They had the following children.

  M i Thomas CLAPP was born on 15 Mar 1639. He died in 1690/1691.
  M ii Samuel CLAPP was born about 1641.
  F iii
Eleazer CLAPP was born 1 about 1643. She died 2, 3 on 26 Mar 1675/1676 in Rehoboth, Bristol, Massachusetts, United States.

Eliezer Clapp
June 12, 1676
Plymouth Colony Wills 3:165
#P269

THE INVENTORY OF ELIEZER CLAPP
An Inventory of the estate of Eliezer Clapp Late of Barnstable deceased

In houses lands and Meddowes 060 00 00

In Monies due from Iohn Otis att seuerall payments as by Informatlon 030 00 00

Item In monyes att Next Fall from Iames houghton of Barnstable 01 15 00

In a Cow in a horse and an old saddle30s 03 05 00

Item in a yeerling 15s in swine 40s in a horse Gears and axes 7s 03 02 00

Item in Sheep att Saconessett 40 in a stillett and other smale thinges 7s 2 07 00

Item; in wases for seruice to the Country due to him 21s 11d 01 01 11

Item in Thomas huckens his hand and in Mr Iohn Pools hand in Goods 05 00 00

---------------

The 12 of the 4th 1676 106 12 11

---------------

[106 10 11]

John Chapman

Thomas huckens

Samuell Clapp of Scittuate appeered ane made oath to the truth of this Inventory of the estate of his brothor Ellezer Clapp aboue said deceased soe farr as hee knowes; and if hee shall Come to the knowlidge of More that hee will alsoe bring it in this 12th of Iune 1676

before Mee Thomas hinckley Assistant

Plymouth Colony Wills, vol. III, p. 165

DEATH: Killed in King Phillip's War.
  M iv Increase CLAPP was christened on 14 May 1640.
  F v Elizabeth CLAPP was born about 1649. She died on 18 Mar 1698.
  F vi
Prudence CLAPP was born 1 about 1651.



LIVING: Umarried when mentioned in father's will on this date.

Richard PARK [Parents] was born 1 on 21 Dec 1663 in Cambridge, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States. He died on 19 Jun 1725 in Concord, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States. Richard married 2 Sarah KING on 5 Nov 1684 in Newton, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States.

Other marriages:
BILLINGS, Elizabeth

He was Lieut. and a representative of Concord. His will, dated 1725, w. Elizabeth sole executrix.
Source: "History of Newton Massachusetts" by Francis Jackson Cambridge or Newton (same place)

Sarah KING [Parents] was born 1 on 18 Sep 1670 in Scituate, Plymouth, Massachusetts, United States. She died 2, 3 on 16 May 1727 in Newton, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States. Sarah married 4 Richard PARK on 5 Nov 1684 in Newton, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States.

They had the following children.

  M i
William PARK was born 1 about 1689 in Concord, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States.
  M ii
Thomas PARK was born 1 on 7 Feb 1690 in Newton, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States. He died 2 on 9 Feb 1702/1703 in Newton, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States.
  F iii Abigail PARK was born on 25 Jul 1693.
  M iv Richard PARK was born on 1 Mar 1696. He died on 28 Nov 1746.
  F v
Sarah PARK was born 1 on 11 May 1699 in Cambridge, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States. She died 2 on 3 Oct 1699 in Newton, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States.

Samuel ALDOUS [Parents] was christened on 8 Apr 1705 in Fressingfield, Suffolk, England, United Kingdom. He died on 28 Feb 1771 in Fressingfield, Suffolk, England, United Kingdom. He was buried on 3 Mar 1771 in Fressingfield, Suffolk, England, United Kingdom. Samuel married Mary HUGGINS on 19 May 1740 in Fressingfield, Suffolk, England, United Kingdom.

Other marriages:
ALDOUS, Elizabeth

From records in the posession of Tim Farr.

Samuel Aldous, blacksmith, for his entire life called the parish of Fressingfield his home; it had been the parish of his forefathers for hundreds of years.  His first wife, who became his bride in 1731, was also an Aldous, by name Elizabeth.  Two and a half years after their marriage Samuel's father, William Aldous, died, and left his property, which was in the hamlet of Wittingham, Fressingfield parish, to Samuel.  Samuel named the same property in his will many years later, so undoubtedly he, with his family, lived in Wittingham hamlet. Samuel and Elizabeth had three children before her death in March of 1738, when their youngest baby was just three months old.

After two years as a widower, thirty-five year old Samuel married seventeen year old Mary Huggins, a maiden from the nearby parish of Laxfield.  She became the mother of eleven children, thus making a total of fourteen for Samuel, three girls and eleven boys. Three of the boys died as infants.

It is difficult for us to truly understand the day to day life of our ancestors of generations ago, but some items do turn up which give us a glimpse into their world.  One of these is penned into the back of volume five of the registers of the parish of Fressingfield, and called "A True Terrier of the Glebe Lands, Messuages, Tenements, Portions of Tythes and other rights belonging to the Vicarage and Parish-Church of Fressingfield in the County of Suffolk and Diocese of Norwich . . . according to the old Evidences and knowledge of the antient Inhabitants this 17 Day of July in the year of our Lord 1740 . . ." Samuel Aldous and his family were parishioners at that time. We will here only quote parts of the document, but will include the full "Portions of Tythes," as that section tells us quite a bit about parish, life, and thus of the life of the Samuel Aldous family.

The document starts off with several descriptions of pieces of land; we will quote a couple:  FIRST.  One peice or parcel of Pasture containing by estimation one Rood late Parcel of a certain close of about three acres called little Crouch-Hill with one house thereupon built wherein the Vicar doth inhabit with a Stable, Orchard & Garden thereunto belonging.  ALLSO.  There is given and settled upon ye Church by his Grace the late ABp Sancroft certain Fee-Farm Rents, pay able out of some Estates in this and the neighbouring Par ish of Mendham, amounting to the yearly value of £52:17s.: 10.5d. out of which the Vicar is to pay £10 yearly to the Schoolmaster and £6 yearly to the Parish Clerk.  And the Remainder is for the augmentation of the Vicarage.   Then we come to:  ALLSO CUSTOMS for small Tythes payable to the Vicar as followeth, as they are deliverd in to the Bishops office at Norwich -  First.  Diverse Parishioners inhabiting within the Ham lets of Chepenhall and Whittingham do pay several cheeses yearly in lieu of all Tythe Milk, according to antient custom of the said Hamlets or money for the same cheeses.  Allso the rest of the Parishoners dwelling in the same Town do pay yearly for every Milch-Cow one penny in full satisfaction and discharge of all Tythe Milk.  Allso the Parishoners of the said Town and Hamlets do pay yearly for every Acre of Meadow ground being mowed as well hardland as Bottom two pence in full satisfaction and discharge of all Tythe-Hay growing thereon.  Allso Every Householder within the said Parish doth pay yearly one Hearth-Hen or money for the same according to the antient custom in full Discharge of all Tythe-wood.  Allso two  pence yearly for one Orchard in full satis faction for all Tythe-Fruit yearly growing within the same.  Allso one  half-penny for every yearly Fyearling] and ye same for every sucking Foal.  Allso One penny for every Gast [barren' cow fatted the same for every Gast Beast fatted two years old & up wards.  Allso one penny for every Colt unwrought after taking from sucking.  Allso five shillings for every marriage and publishing the Banns.  Allso Sixpence for churching Women after Child Birth.  Allso two pence yearly for every communicant. Allso two pence for the Burial of every Person not being a Communicant.  Allso four pence for the Burial of every Person being  a Communicant. Allso all outsitters occupying Lands within the said Town do yearly pay, Tythes (except Tithe Corn) and herbage  for the same in kind or according to value. Allso Tythes are payable in kind or accordin to value  to the Vicar for grazing and fatting of Cattle, for Wool,  Jobs, Hemp, Flax, Tarnips and all other things tytheable throughout the whole Parish not before excepted. Following this is: An Account of Houses Lands and Tenements belonging to the Parish Church of Fressingfield, the Rent whereof is yearly received by the Feoffees and Church-Wardens and expended about the repairs or ornaments of it and other charges belonging to their office. We will not copy the descriptions of the properties here, but will go on to another listing: In money the sum of L2O given by Mr John Shepheard late Vicar, the Interest whereof is ordered by his will to be  laid out yearly for four Bibles to he given to any four  Boys of the Parish who shall in the aptest manner rehearse  the Creeds and the Church Catechism in the Church of Fees  singfield every good-Fryday.

 Samuel Aldous must have been well liked and respected in his community, an indication of this being that his wife's grandfather, Henry Bezant, appointed Samuel executor of his will in 1763, him in preference to sons, sons in law, grandsons, etc.

 Samuel lived until 1771, and in that year died on the twenty eighth of February.  His will, prepared two years before his death, is so informal and delightful, and the spelling so different, that we will give it here in full.  Toward the end he talks directly to his sons Henry and Francis, his executors.  From the will we get an in sight into Samuel's personality and the way he talked.  He also con veys a feeling of love and trust.  The will looks as though written by his own hand, and interestingly he spells his name "Samuel Aldous" in the will, but signs it "Samul Aldus." The will:

 "In the name of god amen, I Samuel Aldous of Fressingfild in the County of Suffolk Blaxsmith Benon wak in Body But Parfet mind and memory thenks Be to god Dou make this my Last will and testament first and principally I Recommend my Soul to allmighty God hoping for parden of all my Sins through the meritts of my Blessed Redemer and my Body to the Earth to be decently Interred at the discretion of my Exutors herein after named.  Imprimis and I give and Beqqath un to my Son Henery Aldous all my Copyholds lands and tenements Weiren I nou Dwell withe the gardne and orchards and Comons and the part in the Brod Rood to him and his Ayers and my Will is that he should have all my Blaxsmith Worken touls and all my Stok of Iron and Coles and all my Stok with out Doors of Catel and all the Rest of my housel gouds and my Will is that he shall pay all my Dets and all my fenerl Charges and my Will is that he shall pay unto my Beloved Wif Mary Aldous four pounds a yet and yerely the fell Tarm of har natral Lif and my Will is that She shall have the Bed in the parler and farnetuer that Be Long to Et and housel gouds to faresnesh arom (furnish a room)  With all and the Dweling in the parler as Long as she Dou Lik and half my housel Lenen and if my Son Henery Aldous Dou not pay my Bloved Wif She shal have foll pour to seas the hous and Land war I nou Dwell and pay har self and my will is that Henry Aldous shal part my Waren aparel amonst his oun Brothers okley [equal ly] and my Will is that he shall pay all my Leges [Legacies] farst Imprimise I give to my Son Francis Aldous the Sum of tharty pounds of good and Lawful rqony of Grat Briten to be paid withan twelv month after my Deas also I give to my Dafter Hany Aldous tharty pounds to be paid at the same time also I give to my Dafter Elizebeth Aldous tharty pounds to be paid at three times and the mony that she have had shal be set of and the farst pay she shal have is five pounds Six Months aftr my Desas and the seken pay to har six month aftr that and five pounds wen my Son Henry Lik to pay that and my will is that all those that have had any mony shal Be set of and I give to my Son Samuel Aldous tharty pounds of good and Lawful mony of Grat Brten also I give to my Son John Aldous tharty pounds and I also give to my- Son Willem Aldows tharty pounds and thes three Sons to Be paid fore yer after my Dasas or wen he Lik I also give to my Son Robard Aldous tharty pounds of good and Lawful mony of Grat Briten and my Will is that henery Aldous shall pay for his yoner Brother five pounds for Edycasen or any tread he Lik and tharty pounds of good and Lawful mony of Grat Briten to Be paid to my Son James Aldous wen he Be twenty four yers old and to your Brother Robard wen you think most propr to pay him and my will is that if you Lend or pay any mony for any of yours Brothers you shal have foll pour to pay your self out of that Legses I Dou appoint francis Aldous and Henery Aldous my Exeuters of this my Last Will and tastment In Witness whereof I have here unto set my hand and Sal this twenty Eight Day of febuarv in the yEr of our Lord on thousen Seven Hundred and sixty nine  Samul Aldus"

Eleven years after Samuel's death his son Henry made a will.  He was a blacksmith, living at Fressingfield, and still unmarried at the age of thirty-nine.  In part he requested that "Mary Aldous my beloved Mother" should receive four pounds yearly from his real estate "(which shall be lett at a propper Rent)" for the remainder of her life, and that the rent should also pay "my Mothers Annuities Taxes Repairs &c . . ." His "Goods Chattles Cattle and Personal Estate (except as is hereinafter excepted)" were to be sold.  He gave "unto Henry Aldous my Brother Samuels Son the Sum of Five Pounds and my Silver Watch, Chain &c. . . " and divided the residue "between my five Brothers (viz.) Samuel Aldous Carpenter, John Aldous Blacksmith, William Aldous Farm er, Robt Aldous Hickler, and James Aldous Blacksmith." He further instructed his executors "as soon after my Mothers decease as conven iently may be to make Sale of all and singular my Houses Lands Shops Hereditments and premisses . . . and the Moneys . . . shall be equally divided . . . amongst such of my Brothers as shall be then Living." He also wanted "to be buried at Fressingfield near my Father and to have two Grave Stone Set down one at my Head and one at my Feet Also my desire is that there shall be two Stones set down likewise for my Mother after her decease." Henry died soon after making his will.

Widow Mary lived until 1784.  The parish register lists her bur ial date as 7 February, but her tombstone says she died 28 February. Probably the parish register is correct.

Many years went by, and son William never married.  He became an old man, and in 1823 wrote a will.  He stipulated that "John Aldous Junr of Thorndon Husbandman and Robert Aldous of Tunstall Grocer and Draper my Nephews" be his executors.  They were to "make sale" of "All that my farm and premises, the houses outhouses and buildings lands medows pastures and grounds yards gardens orchards common rights and appurtenances thereto belonging, in Fressingfield, all in my occupa tion." They were to also sell "all my farming live and dead stock corn hay summerlands much houshold furniture backhouse and dairy uten sils implements and utensils in husbandry plate linen china and glass and effects of what nature or kind soever." The money arising from the sales was "to be equally divided between the children of the late Samuel Aldous of Ubbeston my late brother the children of John Aldous

my brother the children of the late Robert Aldous my brother and the children of James Aldous my brother." Included in the shares was to be "the child or children of the late Henry Aidous son of Robert Aldous my deceased brother." William lived for three and a half years after writing his will.

Mary HUGGINS [Parents] was christened on 3 Feb 1722/1723 in of Laxfield, Suffolk, England, United Kingdom. She died on 24 Feb 1784 in Fressingfield, Suffolk, England, United Kingdom. Mary married Samuel ALDOUS on 19 May 1740 in Fressingfield, Suffolk, England, United Kingdom.

They had the following children.

  M i Samuel ALDOUS was born in 1741. He died on 29 Dec 1819.
  M ii
Henry ALDOUS was born on 18 Jan 1743/1744 in Fressingfield, Suffolk, England, United Kingdom. He was christened on 18 Jan 1743/1744 in Fressingfield, Suffolk, England, United Kingdom. He was buried on 13 Dec 1782.
  M iii John ALDOUS was born on 5 Jan 1746/1747. He died on 7 Jul 1824.
  F iv
Lydia ALDOUS was born in Fressingfield, Suffolk, England, United Kingdom. She was christened on 9 May 1746 in Fressingfield, Suffolk, England, United Kingdom.

DEATH: (young)
  M v William ALDOUS was born on 1 Jun 1748. He was buried on 21 Feb 1827.
  M vi
Jemmy ALDOUS was born in Fressingfield, Suffolk, England, United Kingdom. He was christened on 15 Jan 1750/1751 in Fressingfield, Suffolk, England, United Kingdom. He was buried on 19 Sep 1752.
  M vii Robert ALDOUS was born on 6 Apr 1750. He was buried on 14 Apr 1819.
  M viii
Richard ALDOUS was born on 28 Aug 1752 in Fressingfield, Suffolk, England, United Kingdom. He was christened on 28 Aug 1752 in Fressingfield, Suffolk, England, United Kingdom. He was buried on 13 May 1753.
  M ix James ALDOUS was born on 11 Jun 1755. He was buried on 1 Jul 1831.
  M x
Stephen ALDOUS was born on 1 Nov 1756 in Fressingfield, Suffolk, England, United Kingdom. He was christened on 1 Nov 1758 in Fressingfield, Suffolk, England, United Kingdom.

DEATH: (young)
  M xi
Thomas ALDOUS was born on 3 Dec 1756 in Fressingfield, Suffolk, England, United Kingdom. He was christened on 3 Dec 1756 in Fressingfield, Suffolk, England, United Kingdom. He was buried on 2 Jan 1759.

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