Ancestors of Tim Farr and Descendants of Stephen Farr Sr. of Concord, Massachusetts and Lidlington, Bedfordshire, England


Thomas Davis GILES [Parents] [scrapbook] was born 1 on 28 Nov 1820 in Blaenavon, Monmouthshire, Wales, United Kingdom. He died 2 on 2 Nov 1894 in Provo, Utah, Utah, United States. He was buried 3 on 5 Nov 1894 in Provo, Utah, Utah, United States. Thomas married Margaret THOMAS on 28 Feb 1843 in Merthyr Tydfil, Glamorgan, Wales, United Kingdom.

Thomas was counted in a census 4 in 1841 in Merthyr Tydfil, Glamorgan, Wales, United Kingdom. He resided 5 in 1851 in Llanelly, Breconshire, Wales.

Other marriages:
EVANS, Hannah

I Thos. Giles do commence to write an history of the particular circumstances that have occurred to me during my life. I will at the first place state that my father and mother, Thos. Giles and Maria Giles lived at Blanavon in the Parish of Lanover in the County of Monmouth and that I was born in the year of our Lord 1820 on the 28th day of November and continued to live with my parents there until I was eleven years old when my father removed to Llanvabbon in Glamorganshire and I accompanied him thither where we experienced many difficulties. About this time I obtained a situation as servant to my uncle who was a farmer in this Parish. His wife being my father's sister and although they were rich. I did not experience any benefit of them. I continued with them for about three years when I left them and returned to my father again.

LDS Biographical Encyclopedia, Andrew Jenson, Vol. 2, p.507 Giles, Thomas Davis, popularly known as "Utah's blind harpist", was born Nov. 28, 1820, at Blan, Avon, South Wales, the son of Thos. Giles and Maria Davis. He was one of the [p.508] early converts to "Mormonism" in Wales, and soon after his baptism in 1844, he became a zealous worker in the Church. After laboring in different capacities he became president of the Welsh conference. At a meeting of saints held in Bro. Giles' native town, in 1848, a member of the Church arose and spoke in an unknown tongue, prophesying that something of a very serious nature would shortly happen to some of the leaders of the Church in Wales. A spirit of dread took possession of the little branch, as it was feared that the calamity predicted would come through mob violence, and as a precaution the Elders of the Church from that time ceased going out to labor singly as missionaries. The prediction sure enough came to pass, Bro. Giles, being the victim. One day, while working at his trade, digging coal in a mine, a large piece of coal fell on him, striking him on the head and inflicting a wound nine inches long, rendering him totally blind. The injured man was carried to his home and medical aid hastily summoned. The doctor then bound up the wound in Bro. Giles's head and rendered him other assistance. In taking his leave, the doctor said he did not believe the injured man would live longer than twenty-four hours. News of the sad accident was carried to two Elders of the Church, who hastened to the bedside of their unfortunate brother, whom they anointed with oil, and then prayed for his recovery. He was promised that he would get well and even if he would never see again, he would live to do much good in the Church. A month later he was out traveling through the country attending to his ecclesiastical duties. In the spring of 1856 Bro. Giles received word that he and his family could emigrate to Zion. They crossed the Atlantic in the ship "Samuel Curling", which sailed from Liverpool, England, April 19, 1856. Before leaving Wales the saints there presented Bro. Giles with a splendid harp which he learned to play skillfully. While crossing the plains he lost his wife and two children by death. His sorrow was great and his heart almost broken, but his faith did not fail him. In the midst of his grief he said as did one of old, "The Lord giveth, and the Lord taketh away; blessed be the name of the Lord". At Council Bluffs he joined a handcart company and started again for the Valley. Though blind he pulled a handcart from Council Bluffs to Salt Lake City, Bro. Alfred Reese, who pulled the handcart with him, leading the way. At a certain stage of the journey Bro. Giles became very ill and being unable to keep up with the company, he and his partner were left behind for a day or so, until Apostle Parley P. Pratt came along and administered to Bro. Giles; under the powerful administration of Apostle Pratt, he was miraculously healed, and reached the City of the Saints in safety. Pres. Brigham Young had in his possession at that time a valuable harp, the use of which he feelingly tendered Bro. Giles. In due course of time Bro. Giles's own harp arrived, and then, carrying a letter of introduction from Pres. Young to the Bishops, Bro. Giles traveled from settlement to settlement in Utah, giving concerts and gladdening the hearts of the people with his sweet music. This was his avocation for many years. "In 1895 (Nov. 2nd) the harp of the old blind musician was hung up on the willows! Bro. Giles, its owner, was dead."

Margaret THOMAS was born on 14 Feb 1821 in Merthyr, Glamorgan, Wales, United Kingdom. She died on 15 Oct 1856. Margaret married Thomas Davis GILES on 28 Feb 1843 in Merthyr Tydfil, Glamorgan, Wales, United Kingdom.


Thomas Davis GILES [Parents] [scrapbook] was born 1 on 28 Nov 1820 in Blaenavon, Monmouthshire, Wales, United Kingdom. He died 2 on 2 Nov 1894 in Provo, Utah, Utah, United States. He was buried 3 on 5 Nov 1894 in Provo, Utah, Utah, United States. Thomas married Hannah EVANS on 10 Aug 1857 in Ogden, Weber, Utah, United States.

Thomas was counted in a census 4 in 1841 in Merthyr Tydfil, Glamorgan, Wales, United Kingdom. He resided 5 in 1851 in Llanelly, Breconshire, Wales.

Other marriages:
THOMAS, Margaret

I Thos. Giles do commence to write an history of the particular circumstances that have occurred to me during my life. I will at the first place state that my father and mother, Thos. Giles and Maria Giles lived at Blanavon in the Parish of Lanover in the County of Monmouth and that I was born in the year of our Lord 1820 on the 28th day of November and continued to live with my parents there until I was eleven years old when my father removed to Llanvabbon in Glamorganshire and I accompanied him thither where we experienced many difficulties. About this time I obtained a situation as servant to my uncle who was a farmer in this Parish. His wife being my father's sister and although they were rich. I did not experience any benefit of them. I continued with them for about three years when I left them and returned to my father again.

LDS Biographical Encyclopedia, Andrew Jenson, Vol. 2, p.507 Giles, Thomas Davis, popularly known as "Utah's blind harpist", was born Nov. 28, 1820, at Blan, Avon, South Wales, the son of Thos. Giles and Maria Davis. He was one of the [p.508] early converts to "Mormonism" in Wales, and soon after his baptism in 1844, he became a zealous worker in the Church. After laboring in different capacities he became president of the Welsh conference. At a meeting of saints held in Bro. Giles' native town, in 1848, a member of the Church arose and spoke in an unknown tongue, prophesying that something of a very serious nature would shortly happen to some of the leaders of the Church in Wales. A spirit of dread took possession of the little branch, as it was feared that the calamity predicted would come through mob violence, and as a precaution the Elders of the Church from that time ceased going out to labor singly as missionaries. The prediction sure enough came to pass, Bro. Giles, being the victim. One day, while working at his trade, digging coal in a mine, a large piece of coal fell on him, striking him on the head and inflicting a wound nine inches long, rendering him totally blind. The injured man was carried to his home and medical aid hastily summoned. The doctor then bound up the wound in Bro. Giles's head and rendered him other assistance. In taking his leave, the doctor said he did not believe the injured man would live longer than twenty-four hours. News of the sad accident was carried to two Elders of the Church, who hastened to the bedside of their unfortunate brother, whom they anointed with oil, and then prayed for his recovery. He was promised that he would get well and even if he would never see again, he would live to do much good in the Church. A month later he was out traveling through the country attending to his ecclesiastical duties. In the spring of 1856 Bro. Giles received word that he and his family could emigrate to Zion. They crossed the Atlantic in the ship "Samuel Curling", which sailed from Liverpool, England, April 19, 1856. Before leaving Wales the saints there presented Bro. Giles with a splendid harp which he learned to play skillfully. While crossing the plains he lost his wife and two children by death. His sorrow was great and his heart almost broken, but his faith did not fail him. In the midst of his grief he said as did one of old, "The Lord giveth, and the Lord taketh away; blessed be the name of the Lord". At Council Bluffs he joined a handcart company and started again for the Valley. Though blind he pulled a handcart from Council Bluffs to Salt Lake City, Bro. Alfred Reese, who pulled the handcart with him, leading the way. At a certain stage of the journey Bro. Giles became very ill and being unable to keep up with the company, he and his partner were left behind for a day or so, until Apostle Parley P. Pratt came along and administered to Bro. Giles; under the powerful administration of Apostle Pratt, he was miraculously healed, and reached the City of the Saints in safety. Pres. Brigham Young had in his possession at that time a valuable harp, the use of which he feelingly tendered Bro. Giles. In due course of time Bro. Giles's own harp arrived, and then, carrying a letter of introduction from Pres. Young to the Bishops, Bro. Giles traveled from settlement to settlement in Utah, giving concerts and gladdening the hearts of the people with his sweet music. This was his avocation for many years. "In 1895 (Nov. 2nd) the harp of the old blind musician was hung up on the willows! Bro. Giles, its owner, was dead."

Hannah EVANS. Hannah married Thomas Davis GILES on 10 Aug 1857 in Ogden, Weber, Utah, United States.


David Alma GILES [Parents] was born in Jun 1828 in Blaenavon, Monmouthshire, Wales, United Kingdom. He died 1 in BY 12 APR 1897 in Utah, United States. David married 2 Harriet RICHARDS on 25 Dec 1847 in Merthyr Tydfil, Glamorgan, Wales, United Kingdom.

David was counted in a census 3 in 1841 in Merthyr Tydfil, Glamorgan, Wales, United Kingdom. He received a pension 4 in 1892 in Utah, United States.

Harriet RICHARDS. Harriet married 1 David Alma GILES on 25 Dec 1847 in Merthyr Tydfil, Glamorgan, Wales, United Kingdom.


Alexander KNUDSEN [Parents] was born 1 on 11 Dec 1767 in Asker, Akershus, Norway. He was christened 2 on 20 Dec 1767 in Asker, Akershus, Norway. Alexander married Christine OLSDATTER on 2 Nov 1800 in Ostenstad, Asker, Akershus, Norway.

Other marriages:
AXELSDTR., Gunil Marie

Christine OLSDATTER [Parents] was born 1 on 22 Oct 1771 in Solstad, Asker, Akershus, Norway. She was christened 2 on 27 Oct 1771 in Asker, Akershus, Norway. Christine married Alexander KNUDSEN on 2 Nov 1800 in Ostenstad, Asker, Akershus, Norway.

Other marriages:
, Peder

They had the following children.

  F i
Eli ALEXANDERSDATTER was born on 3 Jun 1801 in Ostenstadeie, Asker, Askershus, Norway. She was christened on 7 Jun 1801 in Asker, Akershus, Norway.
  F ii
Maren Margrethe ALEXANDERSDATTER was born on 25 Nov 1802 in Ostenstadeie, Asker, Askershus, Norway. She was christened on 25 Dec 1802 in Asker, Akershus, Norway.
  M iii Knud ALEXANDERSEN was born on 20 Jan 1805.
  F iv
Kirsti ALEKSANDERSDTR. was born on 11 Jul 1807 in Asker, Akershus, Norway. She was christened on 2 Aug 1807 in Asker, Akershus, Norway. She died on 14 Nov 1825 in Asker, Akershus, Norway. She was buried on 20 Nov 1825 in Asker, Akershus, Norway.
  F v
Oline ALEXANDERSDATTER was born on 11 Jul 1807 in Ostenstadeie, Asker, Askershus, Norway. She was christened on 2 Aug 1807 in Asker, Akershus, Norway.
  M vi
Ole ALEXANDERSEN was born in 1809 in of Norway.
  M vii
Anders ALEXANDERSEN was born on 15 Nov 1811 in Asker, Akershus, Norway. He was christened on 15 Dec 1811 in Asker, Akershus, Norway.

Tollef LARSEN was born 1 on 19 Feb 1769 in of Royken, Buskerud, Norway. He died 2 on 18 Feb 1847 in Norway. Tollef married Berthe JACOBSDAATER on 6 Dec 1810 in of Royken, Buskerud, Norway.

Other marriages:
HANSDAATER, Anne

Father may be Lars Gulbrandsen and mother may be Dorte Sorensen (Sorensdaater)

BIRTH: 19 Feb from IGI

Berthe JACOBSDAATER [Parents] [scrapbook] was born 1 in 1787 in of Royken, Buskerud, Norway. She died after 1856 in Utah, United States. Berthe married Tollef LARSEN on 6 Dec 1810 in of Royken, Buskerud, Norway.

Other marriages:
SEBYE, Mr

Ship: James Nesmith
        Date of Departure:    7 Jan 1855    Port of Departure: Liverpool, England
        LDS Immigrants:      441                 Church Leader: Peter O. Hansen
        Date of Arrival:       23 Feb 1855     Port of Arrival:   New Orleans, Louisiana
Source(s): ¹BMR, Book #1040, pp. 190-207 (FHL #025,690); Customs #55 (FHL #200,181); ²SMR, 1855 (FHL #025,696)

As listed by the Captain, Harvey Mills in New Orleans:
343  Ingeborg C. Sandersen    42       f             Norway
344  Caroline Sandersen       17       f             Norway
345  Berthe J. Sandersen      68       f             Norway

As listed grouped in families:
343  Ingeborg Kirstine Rasmussen with Caroline Rasmussen and Berthe Jacobsdatter Sandersen, all from Norway ¹BMR Norway ²SMR


A Compilation of General Voyage Notes

Notes: "EIGHTIETH COMPANY. -- James Nesmith, 440 souls.  On the twenty-third, twenty-fourth, and twenty-seventh of November, 1854, about five hundred Scandinavian Saints sailed from Copenhagen, Denmark, on board the steamships Slesvig, Cimbria and  Geiser, under direction of Elders Peter O. Hansen and Eric G. M. Hogan.  The two smaller companies, which embarked in the Slesvig and Geiser, traveled by way of Kiel, Hamburg and Hull to Liverpool, England, where, after successful trips, they arrived on the twenty-seventh of November, and the seventh of December, respectively.  The larger company, of nearly three hundred souls, under the presidency of Peter O. Hansen, left Copenhagen, in the Cimbria, on the twenty-fourth of November, all the emigrants being in good health and excellent spirits.  They had an exceedingly rough passage over the German Ocean.  At ten o'clock on the morning of the twenty-fifth, the Cimbria arrived at Frederickshavn, on the east coast of Jutland (Jylland), where one hundred and forty-nine more emigrants from the Aalborg and Vendsyssel conferences came on board.  With these additional passengers the voyage was continued on the morning of the twenty-sixth.  The prospects were fair till about two o'clock in the morning of the twenty-seventh, when the wind turned southwest, and began to blow so heavily that the captain, who appeared to be an experienced sailor and very cautious, deemed it necessary to turn back and seek the nearest harbor in Norway.  Consequently the course was changed, and about four o'clock in the afternoon, the Cimbria put into the port of Mandal, which is an excellent natural harbor, surrounded  by very high and steep granite cliffs.  This romantic place and its surroundings were as much of a curiosity to the Danish emigrants as a ship load of 'Mormons' were to the people of Mandal.  In this harbor the emigrants tarried for several days, while the wind outside spent its fury on the troubled sea.  Some of the Saints went ashore to lodge; they found the inhabitants of Mandal very hospitable, and by request some of the brethren preached several times to the people on shore.  The result of this was that some of the inhabitants subsequently embraced the gospel.   On the morning of December 7th, when the weather seemed to be more favorable, the Cimbria again put to sea, and steamed off towards England once more; but the captain and all on board soon learned that the change in the weather was only a lull preceding a more violent outburst of a long winter storm.  Toward midnight of the seventh, the wind changed to a most terrific storm, which increased in violence till it shattered the ship's bullwarks, and broke a number of boxes.  About two o'clock on the morning of the eighth, the captain decided to turn back to Mandal, but as the wind, waves, and strong current rendered it very dangerous to turn the vessel in the direction of Norway, it was deemed necessary to go clear back to Frederikshavn, where the ship arrived on the ninth, about four p.m.  By this time the emigrants were suffering severely, but with the exception of two or three individuals who decided to remain behind, the Saints bore their hardships with great fortitude and patience.  While laying weather bound in Frederickshavn, most of the emigrants went on shore to refresh and rest themselves after their rough experience; and while waiting for the weather and wind to change in their favor a number of meetings were held which made a good impression upon the people of that seaport town, who hitherto had been unwilling to listen to the preaching of 'Mormonism.'   On the twentieth of December the weather moderated, and the captain made a third attempt to reach England.  By this time the emigrants were rested and in good spirits, but in the night, between the twenty-first and twenty-second, a storm worse than any of the preceding ones arose, threatening the ship and all on board with utter destruction.  For many hours the noble Cimbria fought her way against the raging elements, but was at length compelled to change her course, and for the third time the company was turned back.  The captain and crew now began to feel discouraged, but most of the Saints continued cheerful and thanked the Lord for their preservation.  About two o'clock in the afternoon of the twenty-second, the wind suddenly changed to the north, and the captain immediately steered for Hull again, amid the rejoicings of the Saints, and on the twenty-fourth, about noon, the ship anchored safely in the Humber.  On the following day the emigrants continued the journey by rail from Hull to Liverpool, where they joined the two smaller companies which had left Copenhagen about the same time as the Cimbria, and had waited for the arrival of the latter several weeks.    The presidency in Liverpool, as previously stated, chartered the ship Helios to take the Scandinavian emigration to New Orleans, but the company being detained so long on account of the storms, the Helios had been filled with other passengers, and the James Nesmith, Captain Mills, was secured for the transportation of the Scandinavians.  Consequently, on January 7th, 1855, four hundred and forty (or four hundred and forty-one Saints), all from Scandinavia, except one, sailed from Liverpool, England, on board the last named ship, bound for New Orleans.  On the eighteenth of February the ship arrived at the mouth of the Mississippi River, after a prosperous voyage, during which, however, thirteen deaths occurred.  At New Orleans, where the company landed on the twenty-third, most of the emigrants went on board the large steamboat, Oceanan, and sailed from New Orleans on the twenty-fourth. On the journey up the Mississippi River, seven of the Saints died, and on the seventh of March the company arrived at St. Louis.  From that city, about one hundred and fifty of the Scandinavian Saints continued the journey on the tenth of March for Weston, Missouri, with the intention of remaining somewhere in that section of the country, until they could obtain means to go through to the Valley; and one hundred and seventy-five, under the leadership of P. O. Hansen, left St. Louis on the twelfth, by the steamboat Clara, for Atchison, Kansas, but owing to low water in the river, they were compelled to land in Leavenworth, where they tarried until the company led by Elder Hogan arrived.  During the stay in Leavenworth, about twenty of the emigrants died, and after selecting a new camping place, cholera broke out in the company and caused nine more deaths.  In the latter part of May the emigrants removed to Mormon Grove, situated about five miles west of Atchison, which place had been selected as the outfitting point for the emigrants who crossed the plains in 1855.  They arrived at this point May 22nd.  Millennial Star, Vol. XVII, pp. 72, 221, 270, 290:  Desert News of July 18th, 1855; and Morgenstjernen, Vol. II, page 270.

"Sun. 7. [Jan. 1855]  -- The ship James Nesmith sailed from Liverpool, with 440 Scandinavian and 1 British Saints, under the direction of Peter O. Hansen.  It arrived at New Orleans, Feb. 23rd, and the company continued up the rivers to Fort Leavenworth; afterwards to Mormon Grove."

" . . . On Friday , Nov. 24, 1854 about 300 Scandinavian Saints sailed from Copenhagen, Denmark on board the 'Cimbria' bound for Utah, under the direction of Elder Peter O. Hansen.  All the emigrants were in good health and excellent spirits, but had an exceedingly rough passage over the North Sea.  At 10 o'clock on the morning of the 25th, the 'Cimbria' arrived at Frederikshavn, on the east coast of Jutland, where 149 other emigrants from the Aalborg and Vendsyssel Conferences came on board.  With these additional passengers the voyage was continued on the morning of the 26th.  The prospects were fair until about 2 o'clock in the morning of the 27th, when the wind turned southwest, and began to blow so heavily that the captain, an experienced sailor, deemed it necessary to turn back and seek the nearest harbor in Norway.  Consequently, the course was changed, and about 4 o'clock in the afternoon the 'Cimbria' put into the port of Mandal, which is an excellent natural harbor, surrounded by very high and steep granite cliffs.  This romantic place and its surroundings were as much of a curiosity to the Danish emigrants as a shipload of 'Mormons' were to the people of Mandal.  In this harbor the emigrants tarried for several days, while the winds outside spent their fury on the troubled sea.  Some of the Saints went ashore to lodge; they found the inhabitants of Mandal very hospitable, and, by request, some of the brethren preached several times to the people on shore.  The result of this was that some of the inhabitants became interested in the gospel.    On the morning of Dec. 7th, when the weather seemed to be more favorable, the 'Cimbria' again put to sea, and steamed off towards England once more; but the captain and all on board soon learned that the change in the weather was only a lull preceding a more violent outburst of a long winter storm.  Towards midnight of the 7th, the wind became a terrific gale, which increased in violence till it shattered the ship's bulwarks and broke a number of boxes.  About 2 o'clock in the morning of Dec. 8th, the captain decided to turn back to Mandal, but as the wind, waves and strong current rendered it very dangerous to turn the vessel in the direction of Norway, it was deemed necessary to go clear back to Frederikshavn, where the ship arrived on the 9th about 4 p.m.  By this time the emigrants were suffering severely, but with the exception of two or three individuals, who decided to remain behind, the Saints bore their hardships with great fortitude and patience.  While laying weatherbound in Frederikshavn, most of the emigrants went on shore to refresh and rest themselves after their rough experience at sea, and while waiting for the weather and wind to change in their favor, a number of meetings were held which made a good impression upon the people of that seaport town, who hitherto had been unwilling to listen to the preaching of 'Mormonism.'  On the 20th of December the weather moderated, and the captain made a third attempt to reach England.  By this time the emigrants were rested and in good spirits, but in the night between the 21st and 22nd, a worse storm than any of the preceding ones arose, threatening the ship and all on board with utter destruction.  For many hours the noble 'Cimbria' fought her way against the raging elements, but was at length compelled to change her course, and for the third time the company was turned back.  But while the captain and crew began to feel discouraged, most of the Saints continued cheerful and thanked the Lord for their preservation.  About 2 o'clock in the afternoon of the 22nd, the wind suddenly changed to the north and the captain immediately steered for Hull once more, amid the rejoicings of the Saints, and on the 24th, about noon, the ship anchored safely in the Humber.  On the following day (Dec. 25th) the emigrants continued their journey by rail from Hull to Liverpool, where they joined two smaller companies which had left Copenhagen about the same time as the 'Cimbria,' and had waited for the arrival of the latter for several weeks.   The Presidency in Liverpool chartered the ship 'Helios' to take the Scandinavian emigration to New Orleans, but the company being detained so long on account of the storms, the 'Helios' had been filled with other passengers, and the 'James Nesmith,' Captain Mills, was secured for the transportation of the Scandinavians. Consequently, 440 (or 441) emigrating Saints, all from Scandinavia except one, sailed from Liverpool, England, Jan. 7, 1855, bound for New Orleans. . . ."

They had the following children.

  F i Ingeborg Christine LARSEN was born on 25 Mar 1813. She died after 6 Sep 1868.

Henry Erikson SEBYE was born on 17 Jun 1792 in Vest Agder County, Norway. He died on 14 Oct 1868 in Millcreek, Salt Lake, Utah, United States. Henry married 1 Ingeborg Christine LARSEN on 17 Nov 1856 in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah, United States.

Ingeborg Christine LARSEN [Parents] [scrapbook] was born on 25 Mar 1813 in of Royken, Buskerud, Norway. She died after 6 Sep 1868 in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah, United States. Ingeborg married 1 Henry Erikson SEBYE on 17 Nov 1856 in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah, United States.

Other marriages:
ALEXANDERSEN, Knud

Pioneers and Prominent Men of Utah, p.733
For more info see husband's notes.


TRANSLATION OF AUTOBIOGRAPHY OF
INGEBOR KRISTINE LARSEN, MOTHER OF
CAROLINE ALBERTINE SANDERSON BALLANTYNE

My half sister, Anna Berthea, b. February, 1806, d. April 17, 1838 My cousin, Karen Hans daughter Hagum, b. 1 Feb. 1819, d. 4 Nov. 1850. A seamstress of my best friend, Hagaina Lars daughter Elnea, b. 8 April 1828. In the year 1813, 25th of March, was I, Ingeborg Kristine, born of parents, d. 18 Feb. 1847, Tollef Larsen and Berte, Jacob's daughter. They have had much sorrow and trials for me because of the sickness I have had. It started when I was four years old according to what my parents say. When I was fourteen and one half years old I was confirmed. That same day I was near death from worms, and that same sickness increased, more and more, and I was near death many times in the six months since March 1828. I was healed from the worms with worm medicine and julip. (105 great worms, the biggest a half year long.) I was very glad and thought now I will be well. But that was not the case. My whole body was ruined by medicine. I had lots of pain in my limbs. Big blisters on my whole body and the skin came off. In May, 1828, I got a terrible headache, which lasted from May, 1828 to April 14, 1829. At that time I was with a woman Drovak. I took care of my teeth. I was not able to do any work, so I started to make hats and sew and sell hats and do other kinds of sewing. I had several who learned to sew from me, and I paid by the month. God s providence has been great towards me. In 1832, 4th of October, I was engaged to Knud Alexanderson and married him in 1836, 29th of Feb. I had so much sickness and trouble it cannot be described. In 1837, Sept. 19th, Caroline Albertine was born and I thought now I would be better, but the pain increased more and more and the child could not nurse more than five months because I had to start the medicine again. I drank a lot of sasparalla and other medicine for three years but it did not help. In 1840, in the winter, my right hand and foot became so stiff I couldn t use them. I was now a cripple and it grieved me more than anything, and I prayed God to help because man could not. At last he heard my prayer. A wise woman in Christiania gave me medicine that the Lord blessed and the pain ceased and I slept for ten hours. That was the greatest rest I had had for many months, for the pain was so intense I could not rest in bed and I could not stand the cold of the winter. I had to have a cloth before my face and see through that. When now I got relief my joy was great. After I used this medicine I could bend my fingers and little by little stand on my foot. I shall never forget that great blessing and I thank the Lord for it. I was not lame nor stiff any more.

In 1846, 3rd May, we left our friends and relatives in Røgen and moved to Onsogn and my sickness went with me, though it was not so severe as it had been. I always prayed to the Lord that He would help me, that I should not suffer forever. Then the time would pass, both I and my mother prepared for death as well as we understood, for we knew our troubles would be over and we rejoiced in that. We began to be tired. I over my whole body and mother in her legs. So we thought maybe we had dropsy, which disease nearly always brings death and thus we hoped our troubles would be over; but that was not God s will, even though it was ours. In 1852, Sept. 15, we heard the gospel of Jesus Christ and we accepted it with gladness and joy. Mother was baptized Sept. 22, 1852, and our servant girl Karen Erikson and my daughter Caroline Sanderson. On 27th Sept. our man servant, Ole Elingsen and our servant girl Nikoline Erikson and her brother, Anders, man servant, they all lived with us. Now we were all one and our joy was great. We could hardly eat or sleep for many days. We sang and prayed all in our own words and God gave us many visions and showed us wonderful things which I will not or cannot describe, but it strengthened our faith and we knew it was God's work. He also gave my health back through the laying on of hands of the Elders who had authority from Him. I had not been baptized because I had not my husband's permission, but I had such great faith that those that brought the gospel had the same power that Jesus had. We saw that power and there was light and power everywhere. Persecution started and the brethren were arrested. They had to go to court to testify. That lasted for seven months. The greatest persecution for me was my husband who was against the gospel and against my faith, though he went against his own will and desire and let me be baptized. I was baptized May 18, 1853. I prayed eagerly to God for him. God let him understand the scriptures, but he would not obey. He was good to me. On the 21st of Nov. 1854, we left our fatherland, our property, relatives and friends, and my husband which was hardest for me to leave, and began our journey to Zion.

We were happy and all lived and came to Salt Lake on the 7th of Sept. 1855. Praise be to the Lord for his goodness. On the 17th of Nov.1856, I was married to Henry Erikson Sebye. In Feb. 1861 we got our first endowment and my mother, Berte Jacob's daughter, Berte Pedersen (which is her father's father's name) gr. Father's name) was sealed to Mr. Sebye. A great joy for us that we could be together for eternity. On the 18th of Dec. 1867 we got our second endowments where I wrote my mother's name as Berte Pedersen. I regretted that later in case it should be wrong. She said I should have written Berte, Jacob's daughter (Jacobsen). I write this for a remembrance. If it will be of any use to anybody I don' t know.

Mill Creek Ward, 6th of Sept. 1868

Ingebor Kristine Erikson

The foregoing was given to Caroline Albertine Sanderson Ballantyne by her mother, Ingebor Kristine Larsen. It was written in Norwegian and was translated for a great granddaughter, Josephine Farr Lundwall.


William LAWRENCE Sr was born about 1764/1765. He died 1, 2 on 10 Jan 1837. William married Elizabeth BOWDEN.

Probably from Shipham, Someret.

DEATH: Killed by fall from cart. Age 72.

Elizabeth BOWDEN [scrapbook] was born in 1759 in Ashcott, Somerset, England, United Kingdom. She died 1 on 11 Feb 1819 in Ashcott, Somerset, England, United Kingdom. Elizabeth married William LAWRENCE Sr.

Last name may be "Dowden" or "Bawden"

They had the following children.

  M i William LAWRENCE Jr was born on 23 Dec 1795. He died on 6 Aug 1867.

Thomas WHITNELL [Parents] [scrapbook] was born 1 on 5 Jan 1767 in Ashcott, Somerset, England, United Kingdom. He died on 1 Oct 1839 in Ashcott, Somerset, England, United Kingdom. He was buried 2 on 7 Oct 1839 in Street by Glastonbury, Somerset, England, United Kingdom. Thomas married Elizabeth HIGGINS on 2 Apr 1784 in Street by Glastonbury, Somerset, England, United Kingdom.

May have another son named James.

Elizabeth HIGGINS [Parents] was born in 1765 in Butleigh, Somerset, England, United Kingdom. She was buried on 17 Feb 1839 in Street, Somerset, England, United Kingdom. Elizabeth married Thomas WHITNELL on 2 Apr 1784 in Street by Glastonbury, Somerset, England, United Kingdom.

They had the following children.

  M i Esau WHITNELL was born on 23 Dec 1794. He died on 19 May 1866.
  M ii Jacob WHITNELL was born on 23 Dec 1794. He died on 23 Nov 1866.
  M iii
Wiliam WHITNELL was born about 1796 in Street, Somerset, England, United Kingdom. He was christened 1 on 16 Apr 1797 in Street, Somerset, England, United Kingdom.
  F iv Hester WHITNELL was born on 11 May 1799. She died on 17 Sep 1883.
  M v Thomas WHITNELL was born on 9 Feb 1804. He died on 18 Feb 1873.
  M vi James WHITNELL was christened on 28 Dec 1806. He died on 10 Feb 1880.
  F vii
Elizabeth WHITNELL was born about 1809 in Street, Somerset, England, United Kingdom. She was christened 1 on 11 Oct 1809 in Street, Somerset, England, United Kingdom. She was buried 2 on 15 Oct 1809 in Street, Somerset, England, United Kingdom.
  M viii Jos. WHITNELL was born about 1807. He died on 10 Feb 1880.

Thomas LAWRENCE [Parents] was born on 4 Jun 1822 in Ashcott, Somerset, England, United Kingdom. He was christened 1 on 30 Jun 1822 in Street, Somerset, England, United Kingdom. He died in 1918. Thomas married Hannah Marie WILLIAMS about 1845 in Ashcott, Somerset, England, United Kingdom.

Hannah Marie WILLIAMS was born about 1825 in Ashcott, Somerset, England, United Kingdom. Hannah married Thomas LAWRENCE about 1845 in Ashcott, Somerset, England, United Kingdom.


James LAWRENCE [Parents] was born on 30 Sep 1826 in Ashcott, Somerset, England, United Kingdom. He was christened 1 on 29 Oct 1826 in Street, Somerset, England, United Kingdom. He died on 17 Feb 1908. James married 2 Harriet Martha QUICK on 11 Apr 1846 in Street, Somerset, England, United Kingdom.

James worked 3 as Laborer in Street, Somerset, England, United Kingdom.

Harriet Martha QUICK was born on 2 Jan 1833. She was christened 1 on 28 Jul 1839 in Christ Church, Southwark, London, England, United Kingdom. She was buried 2 on 3 Sep 1892 in Street, Somerset, England, United Kingdom. Harriet married 3 James LAWRENCE on 11 Apr 1846 in Street, Somerset, England, United Kingdom.

BIRTH: per death age

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