Ancestors of Tim Farr and Descendants of Stephen Farr Sr. of Concord, Massachusetts and Lidlington, Bedfordshire, England


J D MARTIN-1665. J D MARTIN married (MRIN:71) Laura Elizabeth BALLANTYNE-63 on 27 Mar 1912.

Laura Elizabeth BALLANTYNE [Parents] [scrapbook]-63 was born on 30 Jun 1874 in Eden, Weber, Utah, United States. She died on 12 Sep 1930. Laura married (MRIN:71) J D MARTIN-1665 on 27 Mar 1912.


Richard WATKINS [Parents] [scrapbook]-332 was christened 1 on 24 Jul 1792 in Banwell, Somerset, England, United Kingdom. He died on 12 Feb 1837 in Wrington, Somerset, England, United Kingdom. He was buried 2 on 19 Feb 1837 in Wrington, Somerset, England, United Kingdom. Richard married 3 (MRIN:72) Ruth HAMLIN-333 on 26 Dec 1815 in St James, Taunton, Somerset, England, United Kingdom.

Laborer up to 1820 and , from 1824, as a carpenter.
Christening: 1)Parish Record 1673-1793 Banwell, Somerset, England Source no. 1517681, Item No. 43. 2)Bishop's Transcripts Source No. 1278896 Item 15 1606-1812 Banwell, Somerset, England. The record reads "Baptism July 24th 1792 Richard, son of William & Mary Watkins."
Marriage: 1)Film #1702100 Eng St. James Marriage Index Researched by Roxeanne  Clark.

LIFE OF RICHARD WATKINS and RUTH HAMLIN WATKINS

In my brief talk this afternoon to the descendants of RICHARD WATKINS and his wife, Ruth Hamlin, of Wrington, Somersetshire, England, on incidents about them with which I am familiar, I want to say that I feel highly honored that this gathering is being held on this my 75th birthday, and before speaking of these incidents, I wish to say a few words concerning my departed cousins, Hyrum and Frank Watkins. I was unable to attend Hyrum's funeral, for which I am very sorry; however, I was able to attend Frank's. I listened with much interest to each speaker and I, with each of them, and all who had contact with them, can say that Frank was truly an honest man, as I can say of Hyrum; and more they were charitable to men to their own material detriment. Their words were their bonds--what better tribute could be paid to any man. My firm belief is that both of these men are at the present time, mingling happily in their spirit body with their progenitors in a spirit world unencumbered by any physical or material matter and are still conscious of this life and happy in their present condition, awaiting the time of reunion with their own loved ones remaining here.

My father has told me he was the first in the Watkins family to embrace Mormonism, being baptized by Elder George Haliday, at the age of 17 years in Bristol, England. He being very religiously inclined, converted James Bartlet and his mother and several members of the family, also my mother's parents and some brothers and sisters, all of whom were baptized.

It remained, however, for my Uncle John and family and Uncle Ralph, widower of Aunt Sarah Ann, our cousin and two sons, Robert and Fred, to pioneer the way to these valleys. (To me it is a goodly land and a good and wonderful people to dwell among.) Personally, I would prefer to live in Hades with my people, right or wrong, to that heaven as taught by so very many of her so-called Christian sects. I have, especially in my latter and more matured years had a feeling of deep gratitude to my Uncle John's family who provided the necessary means to emigrate my father’s family here.

Now, concerning some incidents in the lives of RICHARD AND RUTH WATKINS, our grandparents; I never saw Richard, whom, I was named after — he died many years before I was born. However, I have visited Grandmother Ruth many times each year at her home in Wrington, from my birth until I was 10 years old — when our family left Bristol, where I was born for Chester and then to Utah, arriving here September 26, 1872. I was 14 years old.

Concerning our Grandfather Richard; I speak from statements made to me by my father, who informed me that his grandfather or great-grandfather, William Watkins, I think, came from Wales to Taunton, or perhaps Banwell, Somersetshire, and was there employed as a coachman. He married his employer’s daughter which caused much family trouble to the extent that the daughter was disinherited. After Richard and Ruth were married, they moved to Wrington. An aunt, I am informed whose name I never knew, took compassion on Richard, who was a carpenter and cooper. She bought and had built the old home, called LAVENDER COTTAGE at Wrington and presented it to them. Some of Uncle Thomas' family still live there. The old home in a quaint, old-style English country home, being a two story stone building, slate roof with lower floors of stone slabs. It contains five rooms in all and a wood shed attached and a stone carpenter shop nearby. It is erected on a triangle shaped lot of about one-half acre, a beautiful setting, elevated, and along side of the highway or turnpike road (as it is called there). The shop is in the corner in front of the house and close to the road. This was used by Grandfather as a carpenter and cooper shop. Grandmother's oak coffin boards were kept there in plain sight until she died. It was rather awe inspiring but a custom in those days.

There was an incident which happened before Ruth was married to Richard that may interest you. She and her sister bought two war jugs, agreeing that whoever married first should keep them both. Ruth was married first and kept them; later the jugs were used for everyday purposes and to carry water from the oaken, moss-covered buckets which hung in their well. By the way, it seemed to me to be nothing but moss in and around this well. Grandfather made those oak buckets and also the well covering. Grandmother gave the jugs to my father before her death, and he gave them to me, and I have recently bequeathed them to my own son Richard, who also has a son Richard, and I wouldn’t wonder if many Watkins boys unborn, will be Richards, if only to obtain the old jugs. They are somewhat damaged through use. As a boy, I have carried water from the oak buckets in them. I prize them very much as an heirloom, as I also do our grandfather's Bible and Testament. This Testament contains many items inscribed therein by him. I am informed by my son-in-law John W. Young, who visited Uncle Tom while on his mission a few years ago, that this same well and moss-covered buckets are still in use at this time. I would think the moss has now grown so thickly it would be difficult to sink or raise the bucket.

Grandmother died about six months before we left Chester for Utah. Father went to her funeral from Chester. She was buried along side Grandfather Richard in Wrington Churchyard; a very beautiful church indeed, surrounded by pretty grounds with trees and shrubbery in abundance. I have seen and read the epitaphs on Grandfather's grave stone.

As a matter of records, if you care to keep in yours what I have said, I would go somewhat further by stating that the property of the disinherited William's wife, through some neglect, I am told, of his brothers, was placed in Chancery at London to remain 99 years before further disposition. The date I know not; however, my Father told me that when I was 65 years old we may hear about its disposition. I have heard nothing to rely upon. The deeds of this estate Father brought to Utah. I have seen and handled them. I am told my Uncle John took them to England many years ago and perhaps left them in this Chancery office. Uncle John found relatives working in this office, but they were not interested in him when they found he came from Utah. This information may or may not be of value to the decedents In their work along genealogical lines.

Richard Charles Watkins

Ruth HAMLIN [Parents] [scrapbook]-333 was born on 4 Nov 1792 in Clevedon, Somerset, England, United Kingdom. She was christened 1 on 25 Nov 1792 in Clevedon, Somerset, England, United Kingdom. She died on 21 Apr 1871 in Wrington, Somerset, England, United Kingdom. She was buried on 30 Apr 1871 in Wrington, Somerset, England. Ruth married 2 (MRIN:72) Richard WATKINS-332 on 26 Dec 1815 in St James, Taunton, Somerset, England, United Kingdom.

Ruth was counted in a census 3 in 1841 in Wrington, Somerset, England, United Kingdom. She resided 4 in 1851 in Wrington, Somerset, England. She resided 5 in 1861 in Wrington, Somerset, England. She resided 6 in 1871 in Wrington, Somerset, England.

Other marriages:
BARTLETT, James Jr

RUTH HAMBLIN WATKINS' CONVERSION TO THE L.D.S. CHURCH

She had been deaf for three years when the Elders came to her home and asked if they might use her home for holding a meeting. After explaining who they were and that they had a message for the people, she said yes she liked anything that was good and would open her doors and invited the neighbors to hear what they had to say. They asked her to take a front seat; because of her deafness, they thought she might be able to hear some of their talk. After the meeting was over, the Elders asked her if she had heard any of it, and she said, "I have heard every word distinctly," and asked for baptism. Her husband was afflicted with paralysis and was forced to use crutches, and when he was converted and asked for baptism, the Elders told him that he could not expect to be healed and made well unless he had sufficient faith; so when he was ready for baptism, they ordained Ruth Hamblin's son an Elder. He was by a former husband named Richard Watkins, my great-grandfather so he would be able to help in the baptism because of ____ condition. After the baptism, they brought him his crutches. He walked out of the water and all the way home without the aid of anyone or the crutches. Next morning he walked down to his shop; he was a cooper by trade. He made a bucket and carried it in his hands and swung it around and declared to all the people that he had been healed by the power of the Lord and through his faith. Through this testimony many people in England were converted to the Church.

Scanned and edited by David Cook and Sherrie Markman, Sept 1998.

CENSUS: Ruth Bartlett age 40, husband James Bartlett age 35. Children: John Watkins age 12, Thomas [Henry] Watkins age 10 and Charles Watkins age 9.

They had the following children.

  F i Sarah Ann WATKINS-334 was born on 1 Jun 1817. She died on 8 Sep 1859.
  F ii Mary Ann WATKINS-335 was born in BET 20 APR 1820 AND 1827. She died on 2 Aug 1892.
  M iii
Charles Frederick WATKINS-336 was born in Feb 1822 in Wrington, Somerset, England, United Kingdom. He died on 7 Nov 1822.
  M iv
Edward Charles WATKINS-337 was born in Sep 1824 in Wrington, Somerset, England, United Kingdom. He was christened on 4 Oct 1824. He was buried 1 on 13 Feb 1825 in Banwell, Somerset, England, United Kingdom.
  F v
Eliza Maria WATKINS-338 was born on 25 Nov 1825 in Wrington, Somerset, England, United Kingdom. She was christened on 25 Jun 1826. She died on 10 Sep 1837.
  M vi Edward John WATKINS-64 was born on 4 Mar 1829. He died on 19 Oct 1895.
  M vii Henry Thomas WATKINS-339 was born on 5 Jan 1831. He died on 17 Sep 1905.
  M viii Charles Frederick WATKINS-340 was born on 10 Oct 1832. He died on 12 Nov 1904.

William LAWRENCE Jr [Parents] [scrapbook]-1458 was born 1 on 23 Dec 1795 in Ashcott, Somerset, England, United Kingdom. He was christened 2 on 16 Jan 1796 in Ashcott, Somerset, England, United Kingdom. He died on 6 Aug 1867 in Street, Somerset, England, United Kingdom. He was buried 3 on 10 Aug 1867 in Street, Somerset, England, United Kingdom. William married 4 (MRIN:73) Hester WHITNELL-1459 on 17 Mar 1818 in Ashcott, Somerset, England, United Kingdom.

Hester WHITNELL [Parents] [scrapbook]-1459 was born on 11 May 1799 in Ashcott, Somerset, England, United Kingdom. She was christened 1 on 16 Jun 1799 in Ashcott, Somerset, England, United Kingdom. She died on 17 Sep 1883 in Street, Somerset, England, United Kingdom. She was buried 2 on 22 Sep 1883 in Street, Somerset, England, United Kingdom. Hester married 3 (MRIN:73) William LAWRENCE Jr-1458 on 17 Mar 1818 in Ashcott, Somerset, England, United Kingdom.

They had the following children.

  M i
William LAWRENCE III-1460 was born 1 on 5 Apr 1820 in Ashcott, Street, Somerset, England, United Kingdom. He died on 18 Dec 1842.
  M ii Thomas LAWRENCE-1461 was born on 4 Jun 1822. He died in 1918.
  M iii
John LAWRENCE-1462 was born on 5 Mar 1824 in Ashcott, Street, Somerset, England, United Kingdom. He died on 30 Sep 1831.
  M iv James LAWRENCE-1463 was born on 30 Sep 1826. He died on 17 Feb 1908.
  M v Henry LAWRENCE-1464 was born on 13 Sep 1829. He died on 24 Jan 1911.
  F vi Elizabeth LAWRENCE-65 was born in 6 APR 1831–2. She died on 22 Feb 1886.
  M vii John LAWRENCE-1465 was born on 2 Jun 1834. He died on 5 May 1911.
  M viii Joseph LAWRENCE-1466 was born on 23 Oct 1836. He died on 8 Dec 1909.
  M ix Samuel LAWRENCE-1467 was born on 9 Oct 1841.

James Cooper THOMAS-1666. James married 1 (MRIN:74) Hester Alice WATKINS-66 on 1 May 1882.

Hester Alice WATKINS [Parents]-66 was born on 19 Sep 1865 in Ogden, Weber, Utah, United States. She died on 24 Apr 1946. Hester married 1 (MRIN:74) James Cooper THOMAS-1666 on 1 May 1882.

Other marriages:
NAISBITT, Frederick Charles


Frederick Charles NAISBITT-1667 was born on 30 Jul 1858 in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah, United States. He died on 7 Mar 1936 in Ogden, Weber, Utah, United States. Frederick married 1 (MRIN:75) Hester Alice WATKINS-66 about 1890.

Hester Alice WATKINS [Parents]-66 was born on 19 Sep 1865 in Ogden, Weber, Utah, United States. She died on 24 Apr 1946. Hester married 1 (MRIN:75) Frederick Charles NAISBITT-1667 about 1890.

Other marriages:
THOMAS, James Cooper


Franklin Richard WATKINS [Parents] [scrapbook]-67 was born on 18 Mar 1868 in Ogden, Weber, Utah, United States. He died on 28 Jul 1933 in Ogden, Weber, Utah, United States. He was buried on 1 Aug 1933 in Ogden, Weber, Utah, United States. Franklin married (MRIN:76) Hannah Elizabeth NEWMAN-1668 on 1 Oct 1890 in Logan, Cache, Utah, United States.

Hannah Elizabeth NEWMAN-1668 was born on 20 Apr 1868 in Ogden, Weber, Utah, United States. She died on 29 Jun 1952. She was buried on 2 Jul 1952 in Ogden, Weber, Utah, United States. Hannah married (MRIN:76) Franklin Richard WATKINS-67 on 1 Oct 1890 in Logan, Cache, Utah, United States.


Thomas DOXEY [Parents] [scrapbook]-76 was born on 11 Apr 1868 in Ogden, Weber, Utah, United States. He died 1 on 23 Oct 1939 in Ogden, Weber, Utah, United States. He was buried on 25 Oct 1939. Thomas married (MRIN:77) Bessie Ada Ellen WATKINS-68 on 30 Apr 1890 in Ogden, Weber, Utah, United States.

Thomas worked 2 as Foreman of Streets in Ogden, Weber, Utah, United States.

Bessie Ada Ellen WATKINS [Parents] [scrapbook]-68 was born on 12 Sep 1871 in Ogden, Weber, Utah, United States. She died on 6 Nov 1957 in Provo, Utah, Utah, United States. She was buried on 9 Nov 1957 in Ogden, Weber, Utah, United States. Bessie married (MRIN:77) Thomas DOXEY-76 on 30 Apr 1890 in Ogden, Weber, Utah, United States.


Thomas DOXEY [Parents] [scrapbook] 1-1468 was born 2 on 5 Apr 1801 in Wirksworth, Middleton, Derbyshire, England, United Kingdom. He was christened 3 on 10 Apr 1801 in Wirksworth, Derbyshire, England, United Kingdom. He died 4 on 19 Nov 1849 in St Alkmund, Derby, Derbyshire, England, United Kingdom. He was buried in St Alkmund, Derby, Derbyshire, England, United Kingdom. Thomas married 5 (MRIN:78) Susannah BREARLEY-1469 on 30 Jun 1822 in St Alkmund, Derby, Derbyshire, England, United Kingdom.

Thomas resided 6 in 1841 in St. Michael, Derby, Derbyshire, England, United Kingdom. He worked 7 as House Painter & Artist.

Susannah BREARLEY [Parents] [scrapbook]-1469 was born on 5 Jul 1802 in Ockbrook, Derbyshire, England, United Kingdom. She was christened 1 on 10 Jul 1802 in Ockbrook, Derbyshire, England, United Kingdom. She died 2 on 2 Dec 1867 in Markeaton Street, Derbyshire, England, United Kingdom. Susannah married 3 (MRIN:78) Thomas DOXEY-1468 on 30 Jun 1822 in St Alkmund, Derby, Derbyshire, England, United Kingdom.

Susannah resided 4 in 1841 in St. Michael, Derby, Derbyshire, England, United Kingdom.

They had the following children.

  F i Mary DOXEY-1470 was born on 21 Oct 1822. She died on 25 Aug 1888.
  F ii Ann DOXEY-1471 was born on 18 Nov 1824. She died on 16 Apr 1882.
  F iii
Maria DOXEY-1472 was born on 16 Feb 1827 in Derby, Derbyshire, England, United Kingdom. She died on 1 Aug 1830.
  M iv Thomas DOXEY-69 was born on 27 Mar 1829. He died on 25 Mar 1903.
  M v
David DOXEY-1473 was born on 8 Sep 1831 in All Saints, Derby, Derbyshire, England, United Kingdom. He was christened on 30 Oct 1831. He died on 30 Sep 1868.
  F vi
Jane DOXEY-1474 was born on 16 Dec 1833 in Derby, Derbyshire, England, United Kingdom. She died on 5 Nov 1919.
  M vii
Samuel DOXEY-1475 was christened on 25 Jun 1837 in St Peter, Derby, Derbyshire, England, United Kingdom. He died on 9 Apr 1841.
  F viii Harriet DOXEY-1476 was born on 24 Mar 1839. She died on 8 May 1868.
  M ix
Samuel DOXEY-1477 was born on 5 Sep 1844 in Derby, Derbyshire, England, United Kingdom. He died on 19 Mar 1917.

Thomas DOXEY [Parents] [scrapbook]-69 was born 1 on 27 Mar 1829 in Wirksworth, Derbyshire, England, United Kingdom. He was christened 2 on 3 May 1829 in All Saints, Derby, Derbyshire, England, United Kingdom. He died 3, 4 on 25 Mar 1903 in Ogden, Weber, Utah, United States. He was buried on 28 Mar 1903. Thomas married 5 (MRIN:79) Ann ALLEN-14564 on 7 Apr 1849 in Derby, Derbyshire, England, United Kingdom.

Other marriages:
ELEY, Elisabeth
HUNT, Ann Elizabeth
RHODES, Mary

Pioneers and Prominent Men of Utah, p.847
DOXEY, THOMAS (son of Thomas Doxey, born October, 1801, and Susannah Brearly, who was born June 5, 1802, at Derby, Eng., married July 6, 1821). He was born March 27, 1829, In Derby. Came to Utah 1853, Appleton Harmon company.
Pioneers and Prominent Men of Utah, p.847
Married Ann Elizabeth Hunt July 10, 1853, Council Bluffs, Iowa (daughter of John Hunt and Mary Danby), who was born Dec. 20, 1830, and came to Utah with husband. Their children: Alma T. b. July 14, 1854, m. Leonora L. Eaton June 23, 1880; Mary Ann b. Aug. 28, 1856, m. Joseph H. Watkins April 30, 1879; David Hunt b. June 13, 1858, m. Ann E. Clark Oct. 31, 1889, d. Nov. 2, 1910; Moroni Hunt b. Aug. 13, 1860, m. Olive J. Riley June 11, 1887, d. Dec. 6, 1903; Jane b. Nov. 27, 1863, d. Aug. 10, 1865; Samuel b. Feb. 17, 1866, d. Feb. 8, 1907; m. Margret N. Moyes Aug. 31, 1898; Thomas b. April 11, 1868, m. Bessie A. E. Watkins April 30, 1889. Family resided Salt Lake City and Ogden, Utah.
Married Mary Rhodes Feb. 26, 1872, at Salt Lake City (daughter of George Rhodes and Alice Mellor), who was born Sept. 11, 1850, St. Louis, Mo. Their children: James b. Aug. 15, 1873, d. March 24, 1894; Ellen Mellor b. Sept. 26, 1875, m. Nels Sorensen Oct. 10, 1895; Rosetta b. Jan. 7, 1878, m. Wallace Fife Nov. 22, 1899; John b. Oct. 14, 1879, m. Loretta Bingham May 10, 1899; Mary Alice b. Nov. 16, 1881, m. Henry A. Hill Jan. 7, 1902; George R. b. Dec. 22, 1883, m. Chloe Woods Nov. 23, 1910; Albert b. Dec. 2, 1885, m. Minnie Baird Jan. 1, 1905; William R. b. Aug. 14, 1888, d. Jan. 2, 1890; Clara b. Nov. 7, 1890; Susannah B. b. June 1, 1893, m. Fredrick Paul Nisbitt Jan. 22, 1913. Family home, Ogden.
City watermaster 15 years; road supervisor 1888; member State Irrigation association 1895. Captain in Nauvoo Legion. Second counselor to Bishop Robert McQuarrie 1879; member Weber state high council; superintendent 2d ward Sunday school. Member city council. Farmer.

LDS Biographical Encyclopedia, Andrew Jenson, Vol. 2, p.761 Doxey, Thomas, a High Councilor in the Weber Stake of Zion, was born March 27, 1829, at Derby, Derbyshire, England, the son of Thomas Doxey and Susannah Brearley. He was baptized May 8, 1850, by Joseph Hall, in Derby; was ordained a Deacon March 16, 1851, by Jacob Gates; ordained a Teacher Feb. 17, 1852, in Derby; emigrated to Utah in 1853; was ordained a Seventy Feb. 12, 1854, by John Back; located at Ogden in 1855; served as clerk and recorder in the Ogden Second Ward from 1856 to 1858; labored as a Ward teacher from 1856 to 1879; was set apart as one of the presidents of the 60th quorum of Seventy Feb. 11, 1859, by Lyman A. Shurtliff; ordained a High Priest and set apart as a High Councilor in the Weber Stake March 19, 1870, by Geo. Q. Cannon, and was set apart as second counselor to Bishop Robt. McQuarrie in 1879. Bro. Doxey served as water master for Ogden City from 1870 to 1883; was appointed a councilman for the second municipal ward, Ogden, in 1882; served as superintendent of the Ogden Second Ward Sunday School from 1867 to 1881; was set apart as first counselor to Bishop Robt. McQuarrie July 6, 1884, and served thus till 1889.
He was appointed an alternate High Councilor Jan. 19, 1890, and became a regular member of that body July 18, 1892. Bro. Doxey died in Ogden, March 25, 1903.[p.762]

The following account was apparently prepared from a personal interview with Thomas Doxey. The interviews took place after 1894, the year "James died" and before 1902 when the book in which it appears was printed:


THOMAS DOXEY. Like the "Forty-niners," the "Early Settlers" of Utah are rapidly passing away, and it is a most interesting thing to meet and converse with one who has seen this country through all its various stages of progression, from an undeveloped wilderness to a land teeming with agricultural and mineral wealth.

Mr. Doxey came to Utah while it was yet in its wild stage, and he himself a young man. He is a native of England, his birthplace having been in the town of Derby, in Derbyshire, where he first saw the light of day on March 27, 1829. His parents were Thomas and Susannah (Brearley) Doxey, both natives of Derbyshire. After completing his schooling, our subject served an apprenticeship in the silk mills of his town, where he learned the silk twisting business. In 1850, he became a member of the Mormon Church. After his conversion, he spent about three years as a teacher in the Sunday School, part of which time he was superintendent and held various offices.

On March 28, 1853, he severed his connection with his old life and took passage on the ship Falcon, at Liverpool, being one of a company of several hundred converts to the Mormon religion who were bound for Utah. They were on the ocean seven weeks and two days, landing in New Orleans, and after reaching Winter Quarters crossed the plains in the company under Captain Harmon. Everything went well until they reached Green River, Wyoming, when they ran out of provisions, and the Captain called for a company of volunteers who would come on foot to Salt Lake City and report the condition of affairs to President Brigham Young. Mr. Doxey was one of these volunteers, with twelve others, and they arrived in Salt Lake on October 5th, eleven days in advance of the rest of the company who had been coming forward as fast as their limited rations- would allow, and were met by the relief force sent out by President Young.

Upon arriving in Utah, Mr. Doxey went to work in the Red Butte stone quarry, getting out rocks for the temple, making his home in the Twentieth Ward, where he bought a lot from Brigham Young, and built a small adobe house on a part of Brigham Young's new survey. He remained in the quarries until the spring of 1855, at which time public work had to be abandoned on account of the grasshoppers destroying all the crops and causing a great deal of suffering on account of scarcity of food. Our subject came to Ogden in June of that year and made his home in the Second Ward, doing anything he could find in order to make a livelihood. He cleared off a small piece of land on the Ogden river, where he put in some crops in 1858, but had to abandon it during the general move south, caused by the entrance into the territory of Johnston's army. Mr. Doxey went to Spanish Fork, and while there made adobe bricks. When the army went into winter quarters at Camp Floyd, Mr. Doxey went there and continued the adobe making, which he sold to the government for building the soldiers' quarters, and in this way was able to get on his feet again, financially, and after making some necessary purchases went back to Spanish Fork, where he secured an outfit and returned from there to his Ogden home, and once more began the cultivation of his land, trading it a little later for a farm at the forks of the Ogden and Weber rivers. This land also had to be cleared, being covered with a dense growth of willows, and box elder and cottonwood trees, some of them measuring two feet in diameter. However, he persevered, and finally had a good farm. In the course of time, the Weber river changed its course, and this resulted in ruining the farm, and Mr. Doxey was compelled to buy more land, buying his present place, which adjoins the old place. He now owns twenty acres, part of which is in Ogden City. He has followed general farming, fruit and vegetable raising, and has been very successful, marketing his produce at a good price.

For thirteen years he served as water master for the Weber canal, assisted in making many of the canals, and stood shoulder to shoulder with the civil and religious authorities in developing the country. He was also for many years assistant deputy road supervisor and poll tax collector, both before and after the California emigrants were going through, assisting Chas. Welch, who was road supervisor and poll tax collector. In the Nauvoo Legion, he held the rank of captain, being elected November 18, 1865, in Company D, Second Battalion Infantry, First Regiment, First Brigade, and under Major Monroe took part in the Echo canyon campaign, his company being the first to go out of Weber county. He went with his regiment as far as Soda Springs to meet Johnston's army, and on returning was again sent to Echo canyon where they remained until snow fell.

In political life, he was for part of one term city councilman, and in the early days served fourteen years as special policeman, and took an active part in developing the country in general.

He has also been very active in church matters, being presiding teacher and recorder of the ward for twenty-five years. In 1853, he was ordained a member of the Thirty-ninth Quorum, being ordained one of the presidents of the sixtieth quorum of seventies of Ogden in 1859. He was ordained a high priest on March 19, 1879, and set apart as a member of the high council, Weber Stake of Zion. January 19, 1879, was appointed second counselor to Bishop Robert McQuarrie, of the Second Ward, Ogden, holding that position, until 1884, when he became first counselor and remained in the bishopric until he moved onto his farm in 1889. He was a teacher in the Ogden Sunday School from the time of its organization, and was for thirteen years superintendent of the Second Ward Sunday School. In the spring of 1890, after having moved to his farm, he was appointed alternate in the high council, and on July 2, 1892, became a regular member, still holding that position. He has been connected with all the interests of the county, both religiously and politically, and still retains much of his interest, acting whenever his health will permit, as a missionary throughout the county.

Mr. Doxey has been married a number of times. He lost two wives in England, through sickness, neither of whom had any children. In 1853, he married at Council Bluffs, Ann Elizabeth Hunt, a daughter of John and Mary (Danby) Hunt. Her mother died on the plains enroute to Utah. She was a native of Hull, England, and died in 1873, leaving a family of six children, all of whom are now married and living. They are: Alma Thomas; Mary Ann, wife of Joseph H. Watkins; David Hunt; Maroni H.; Samuel, for several years principal of the Washington school in Salt Lake City, but now superintendent of manual training in the Salt Lake City schools; Thomas, Jr. his present wife is Mary Rhoades, the daughter of George and Alice (Woolstenhume) Rhoads. Her father died in St. Louis in 1852, from sun stroke, and her mother remarried to Thomas Hill, who raised Mrs. Doxey from infancy. She has borne him ten children, eight of whom are living: James died in 1894, at the age of twenty-one years; Ellen Mellor, now the wife of Nels Sorensen; Rosetta, wife of Wallace Fife; John married Loretta Bingham; Mary Alice, wife of Henry A. Hill, Jr.; George Rhoades; Albert; William, died in 1890, at the age of two years; Clara; Susannah Brearley.

Portrait, Genealogical and Biographical Record of the State of Utah, (Printed by National Historical Record Co., Chicago, 1902) pp. 196-197.


The Ogden Standard, Thirty Third Year, No. 72
THOMAS_DOXEY DEAD
HE SUCCUMBS AFTER AN ILLNESS OF OVER TWO YEARS STARTING FROM AN ATTACK OF APPENDICITIS.

He Was Born in Derbyshire, England,
and Came to Weber County In 1852
-He Was the Father of Prof. Sam­uel Doxey of the Salt take City Schools.

'Thomas Doxey, a pioneer and old resi­dent of Weber county, died at 12 o'clock today of a complication of diseases at, his residence on West 21st street. He has been ill for over two years. His sick­ness first starting from an attack of appendicitis. No arrangements have as yet been made as to the funeral but it is probable that it will be held Sunday.
Mr. Doxey was a pioneer in Weber county and came to this section In 1852. He was born in Derbyshire, England and would have been 74 years f age if he had lived until Friday. He was the father of eighteen children, fifteen of whom are still living and are residents of Ogden and Weber county, with the exception of Prof. Samuel Doxey formerly one of the principals of the Ogden schools, but now a principal in the city schools at Salt Lake city.

DEATH: Illness of over two years brought on by an attack of appendicitis.

Ann ALLEN-14564 was born on 19 Dec 1827 in Derby, Derbyshire, England, United Kingdom. She was christened 1 on 24 Dec 1827 in Saint Alkmund, Derby, Derby, England. She died on 12 May 1849 in Derby, Derbyshire, England, United Kingdom. She was buried about 1849 in Derbyshire, England. Ann married 2 (MRIN:79) Thomas DOXEY-69 on 7 Apr 1849 in Derby, Derbyshire, England, United Kingdom.

They had the following children.

  F i
Susannah DOXEY-14565 was born on 30 Apr 1849 in Derby, Derbyshire, England, United Kingdom. She was christened 1 on 7 May 1849 in Derby, Derbyshire, England, United Kingdom. She died on 12 May 1849. She was buried 2 on 15 May 1849 in St Alkmund's Church, Derby, Derbyshire, England.

Thomas DOXEY [Parents] [scrapbook]-69 was born 1 on 27 Mar 1829 in Wirksworth, Derbyshire, England, United Kingdom. He was christened 2 on 3 May 1829 in All Saints, Derby, Derbyshire, England, United Kingdom. He died 3, 4 on 25 Mar 1903 in Ogden, Weber, Utah, United States. He was buried on 28 Mar 1903. Thomas married 5 (MRIN:80) Elisabeth ELEY-14577 on 25 Dec 1850 in Derby, Derbyshire, England.

Other marriages:
ALLEN, Ann
HUNT, Ann Elizabeth
RHODES, Mary

Pioneers and Prominent Men of Utah, p.847
DOXEY, THOMAS (son of Thomas Doxey, born October, 1801, and Susannah Brearly, who was born June 5, 1802, at Derby, Eng., married July 6, 1821). He was born March 27, 1829, In Derby. Came to Utah 1853, Appleton Harmon company.
Pioneers and Prominent Men of Utah, p.847
Married Ann Elizabeth Hunt July 10, 1853, Council Bluffs, Iowa (daughter of John Hunt and Mary Danby), who was born Dec. 20, 1830, and came to Utah with husband. Their children: Alma T. b. July 14, 1854, m. Leonora L. Eaton June 23, 1880; Mary Ann b. Aug. 28, 1856, m. Joseph H. Watkins April 30, 1879; David Hunt b. June 13, 1858, m. Ann E. Clark Oct. 31, 1889, d. Nov. 2, 1910; Moroni Hunt b. Aug. 13, 1860, m. Olive J. Riley June 11, 1887, d. Dec. 6, 1903; Jane b. Nov. 27, 1863, d. Aug. 10, 1865; Samuel b. Feb. 17, 1866, d. Feb. 8, 1907; m. Margret N. Moyes Aug. 31, 1898; Thomas b. April 11, 1868, m. Bessie A. E. Watkins April 30, 1889. Family resided Salt Lake City and Ogden, Utah.
Married Mary Rhodes Feb. 26, 1872, at Salt Lake City (daughter of George Rhodes and Alice Mellor), who was born Sept. 11, 1850, St. Louis, Mo. Their children: James b. Aug. 15, 1873, d. March 24, 1894; Ellen Mellor b. Sept. 26, 1875, m. Nels Sorensen Oct. 10, 1895; Rosetta b. Jan. 7, 1878, m. Wallace Fife Nov. 22, 1899; John b. Oct. 14, 1879, m. Loretta Bingham May 10, 1899; Mary Alice b. Nov. 16, 1881, m. Henry A. Hill Jan. 7, 1902; George R. b. Dec. 22, 1883, m. Chloe Woods Nov. 23, 1910; Albert b. Dec. 2, 1885, m. Minnie Baird Jan. 1, 1905; William R. b. Aug. 14, 1888, d. Jan. 2, 1890; Clara b. Nov. 7, 1890; Susannah B. b. June 1, 1893, m. Fredrick Paul Nisbitt Jan. 22, 1913. Family home, Ogden.
City watermaster 15 years; road supervisor 1888; member State Irrigation association 1895. Captain in Nauvoo Legion. Second counselor to Bishop Robert McQuarrie 1879; member Weber state high council; superintendent 2d ward Sunday school. Member city council. Farmer.

LDS Biographical Encyclopedia, Andrew Jenson, Vol. 2, p.761 Doxey, Thomas, a High Councilor in the Weber Stake of Zion, was born March 27, 1829, at Derby, Derbyshire, England, the son of Thomas Doxey and Susannah Brearley. He was baptized May 8, 1850, by Joseph Hall, in Derby; was ordained a Deacon March 16, 1851, by Jacob Gates; ordained a Teacher Feb. 17, 1852, in Derby; emigrated to Utah in 1853; was ordained a Seventy Feb. 12, 1854, by John Back; located at Ogden in 1855; served as clerk and recorder in the Ogden Second Ward from 1856 to 1858; labored as a Ward teacher from 1856 to 1879; was set apart as one of the presidents of the 60th quorum of Seventy Feb. 11, 1859, by Lyman A. Shurtliff; ordained a High Priest and set apart as a High Councilor in the Weber Stake March 19, 1870, by Geo. Q. Cannon, and was set apart as second counselor to Bishop Robt. McQuarrie in 1879. Bro. Doxey served as water master for Ogden City from 1870 to 1883; was appointed a councilman for the second municipal ward, Ogden, in 1882; served as superintendent of the Ogden Second Ward Sunday School from 1867 to 1881; was set apart as first counselor to Bishop Robt. McQuarrie July 6, 1884, and served thus till 1889.
He was appointed an alternate High Councilor Jan. 19, 1890, and became a regular member of that body July 18, 1892. Bro. Doxey died in Ogden, March 25, 1903.[p.762]

The following account was apparently prepared from a personal interview with Thomas Doxey. The interviews took place after 1894, the year "James died" and before 1902 when the book in which it appears was printed:


THOMAS DOXEY. Like the "Forty-niners," the "Early Settlers" of Utah are rapidly passing away, and it is a most interesting thing to meet and converse with one who has seen this country through all its various stages of progression, from an undeveloped wilderness to a land teeming with agricultural and mineral wealth.

Mr. Doxey came to Utah while it was yet in its wild stage, and he himself a young man. He is a native of England, his birthplace having been in the town of Derby, in Derbyshire, where he first saw the light of day on March 27, 1829. His parents were Thomas and Susannah (Brearley) Doxey, both natives of Derbyshire. After completing his schooling, our subject served an apprenticeship in the silk mills of his town, where he learned the silk twisting business. In 1850, he became a member of the Mormon Church. After his conversion, he spent about three years as a teacher in the Sunday School, part of which time he was superintendent and held various offices.

On March 28, 1853, he severed his connection with his old life and took passage on the ship Falcon, at Liverpool, being one of a company of several hundred converts to the Mormon religion who were bound for Utah. They were on the ocean seven weeks and two days, landing in New Orleans, and after reaching Winter Quarters crossed the plains in the company under Captain Harmon. Everything went well until they reached Green River, Wyoming, when they ran out of provisions, and the Captain called for a company of volunteers who would come on foot to Salt Lake City and report the condition of affairs to President Brigham Young. Mr. Doxey was one of these volunteers, with twelve others, and they arrived in Salt Lake on October 5th, eleven days in advance of the rest of the company who had been coming forward as fast as their limited rations- would allow, and were met by the relief force sent out by President Young.

Upon arriving in Utah, Mr. Doxey went to work in the Red Butte stone quarry, getting out rocks for the temple, making his home in the Twentieth Ward, where he bought a lot from Brigham Young, and built a small adobe house on a part of Brigham Young's new survey. He remained in the quarries until the spring of 1855, at which time public work had to be abandoned on account of the grasshoppers destroying all the crops and causing a great deal of suffering on account of scarcity of food. Our subject came to Ogden in June of that year and made his home in the Second Ward, doing anything he could find in order to make a livelihood. He cleared off a small piece of land on the Ogden river, where he put in some crops in 1858, but had to abandon it during the general move south, caused by the entrance into the territory of Johnston's army. Mr. Doxey went to Spanish Fork, and while there made adobe bricks. When the army went into winter quarters at Camp Floyd, Mr. Doxey went there and continued the adobe making, which he sold to the government for building the soldiers' quarters, and in this way was able to get on his feet again, financially, and after making some necessary purchases went back to Spanish Fork, where he secured an outfit and returned from there to his Ogden home, and once more began the cultivation of his land, trading it a little later for a farm at the forks of the Ogden and Weber rivers. This land also had to be cleared, being covered with a dense growth of willows, and box elder and cottonwood trees, some of them measuring two feet in diameter. However, he persevered, and finally had a good farm. In the course of time, the Weber river changed its course, and this resulted in ruining the farm, and Mr. Doxey was compelled to buy more land, buying his present place, which adjoins the old place. He now owns twenty acres, part of which is in Ogden City. He has followed general farming, fruit and vegetable raising, and has been very successful, marketing his produce at a good price.

For thirteen years he served as water master for the Weber canal, assisted in making many of the canals, and stood shoulder to shoulder with the civil and religious authorities in developing the country. He was also for many years assistant deputy road supervisor and poll tax collector, both before and after the California emigrants were going through, assisting Chas. Welch, who was road supervisor and poll tax collector. In the Nauvoo Legion, he held the rank of captain, being elected November 18, 1865, in Company D, Second Battalion Infantry, First Regiment, First Brigade, and under Major Monroe took part in the Echo canyon campaign, his company being the first to go out of Weber county. He went with his regiment as far as Soda Springs to meet Johnston's army, and on returning was again sent to Echo canyon where they remained until snow fell.

In political life, he was for part of one term city councilman, and in the early days served fourteen years as special policeman, and took an active part in developing the country in general.

He has also been very active in church matters, being presiding teacher and recorder of the ward for twenty-five years. In 1853, he was ordained a member of the Thirty-ninth Quorum, being ordained one of the presidents of the sixtieth quorum of seventies of Ogden in 1859. He was ordained a high priest on March 19, 1879, and set apart as a member of the high council, Weber Stake of Zion. January 19, 1879, was appointed second counselor to Bishop Robert McQuarrie, of the Second Ward, Ogden, holding that position, until 1884, when he became first counselor and remained in the bishopric until he moved onto his farm in 1889. He was a teacher in the Ogden Sunday School from the time of its organization, and was for thirteen years superintendent of the Second Ward Sunday School. In the spring of 1890, after having moved to his farm, he was appointed alternate in the high council, and on July 2, 1892, became a regular member, still holding that position. He has been connected with all the interests of the county, both religiously and politically, and still retains much of his interest, acting whenever his health will permit, as a missionary throughout the county.

Mr. Doxey has been married a number of times. He lost two wives in England, through sickness, neither of whom had any children. In 1853, he married at Council Bluffs, Ann Elizabeth Hunt, a daughter of John and Mary (Danby) Hunt. Her mother died on the plains enroute to Utah. She was a native of Hull, England, and died in 1873, leaving a family of six children, all of whom are now married and living. They are: Alma Thomas; Mary Ann, wife of Joseph H. Watkins; David Hunt; Maroni H.; Samuel, for several years principal of the Washington school in Salt Lake City, but now superintendent of manual training in the Salt Lake City schools; Thomas, Jr. his present wife is Mary Rhoades, the daughter of George and Alice (Woolstenhume) Rhoads. Her father died in St. Louis in 1852, from sun stroke, and her mother remarried to Thomas Hill, who raised Mrs. Doxey from infancy. She has borne him ten children, eight of whom are living: James died in 1894, at the age of twenty-one years; Ellen Mellor, now the wife of Nels Sorensen; Rosetta, wife of Wallace Fife; John married Loretta Bingham; Mary Alice, wife of Henry A. Hill, Jr.; George Rhoades; Albert; William, died in 1890, at the age of two years; Clara; Susannah Brearley.

Portrait, Genealogical and Biographical Record of the State of Utah, (Printed by National Historical Record Co., Chicago, 1902) pp. 196-197.


The Ogden Standard, Thirty Third Year, No. 72
THOMAS_DOXEY DEAD
HE SUCCUMBS AFTER AN ILLNESS OF OVER TWO YEARS STARTING FROM AN ATTACK OF APPENDICITIS.

He Was Born in Derbyshire, England,
and Came to Weber County In 1852
-He Was the Father of Prof. Sam­uel Doxey of the Salt take City Schools.

'Thomas Doxey, a pioneer and old resi­dent of Weber county, died at 12 o'clock today of a complication of diseases at, his residence on West 21st street. He has been ill for over two years. His sick­ness first starting from an attack of appendicitis. No arrangements have as yet been made as to the funeral but it is probable that it will be held Sunday.
Mr. Doxey was a pioneer in Weber county and came to this section In 1852. He was born in Derbyshire, England and would have been 74 years f age if he had lived until Friday. He was the father of eighteen children, fifteen of whom are still living and are residents of Ogden and Weber county, with the exception of Prof. Samuel Doxey formerly one of the principals of the Ogden schools, but now a principal in the city schools at Salt Lake city.

DEATH: Illness of over two years brought on by an attack of appendicitis.

Elisabeth ELEY-14577 was born on 3 Apr 1832 in St Peters, Derby, Derbyshire, England. She was christened 1 on 22 Apr 1832 in St. Werburgh, Derby, Derbyshire, England, United Kingdom. She died on 15 Feb 1852 in Derbyshire, England. Elisabeth married 2 (MRIN:80) Thomas DOXEY-69 on 25 Dec 1850 in Derby, Derbyshire, England.

Elisabeth resided 3 in 1851 in St Werburghs, Derbyshire, England.

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